LED's

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by belindamotion, 29 Jul 2011.

  1. belindamotion

    belindamotion Google Master

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    I wouldn't mind having my BOYU Hood looking like this..actually this is how I want it to look..:blush:

    JBJ-USA Aquarium Products

    Are the LED's getting better and better for Aquariums or are they just getting presented in a better way...sounds to me LED's are the way to go..hopefully with more Aquariums coming out completed with LED's...the prices of LED's will come down, so that we can upgrade without breaking the Bank...Hmmmm don't Sponsors see a gap in the Market? Someone, somewhere is going to make the first move and make a killing...IMHO:blush:
     
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  3. KeeganP

    KeeganP

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    wow that looks nice, any idea on price of the hood?
     
  4. belindamotion

    belindamotion Thread Starter Google Master

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  5. Dlaria

    Dlaria

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    I just ordered one of these. It'll be here Tuesday.
    Does anyone know if I'll need any supplemental lighting?

    The Marineland Reef Capable LED Lighting System provides the correct intensity and spectral output to maintain reef aquariums. These LED’s produce a high quality, natural-looking light that shimmers and creates shadows throughout the water, adding depth and dimension to the aquarium.Use the white LEDs during the day and the blue LEDs at night to enjoy the aquarium at all hours of the day. The LED Light has a unique, sleek, contemporary design that makes other aquarium lights obsolete.



    Highlights

    Powered by Energy Efficient 1 watt LED’s that provide the correct intensity and spectral output to maintain reef aquariums.
    Slim, stylized lighting profile.
    Mimics underwater “shimmer” effect of natural sunlight.
    Energy efficient system that doesn’t require any bulb replacement.
    Two modes of lighting, Daytime (white and blue LEDs), Lunar (blue LEDs only).
    Lifetime Hours - 50,000 hours.
    Support legs adjust to fit multiple aquarium lengths
     
  6. eb.adam

    eb.adam

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    the same can be achieved by the DIY route... Check the threads for links to companies that sell... Saw somewhere for $55-$75...
     
  7. Dlaria

    Dlaria

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    I'm an old lady. I don't diy very well. :)
     
  8. belindamotion

    belindamotion Thread Starter Google Master

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    :005::005:..LOVE IT..that's how I feel most of the time when the guys try and explain to me how I can DIY and save myself a fortune..:lol:
     
  9. belindamotion

    belindamotion Thread Starter Google Master

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    Looks nice and sleek..
    Reef Capable LED Lighting System
     
  10. belindamotion

    belindamotion Thread Starter Google Master

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  11. jaquesdp08

    jaquesdp08

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    Speak to TSR Reefs (Nathan) hes got some nice LED units
     
  12. Kolognekoral

    Kolognekoral

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    OK, LEDs are a well known entity for me, so let me give you some basics. First, they are not all equal. The current leading brand is Cree and I've not found a superior brand in over 2 years. They are the cutting edge for LED manufacture, so look for fixtures that are using these. There may be others almost as good, but Cree is the proven leader.

    Second, you want leds running at aprox 2.5-3 watt. Now, this is deceiving, as previous lamps, such as halides and T5s are rated per Watt, which is their power consumption. It has nothing to do with brightness! Never did, it was just a convienient way to categorize similar light sources. LEDs are categorized via lumens per Watt. That is to say, how much light do they produce at a specific wattage (power consumption). They can be run at various wattages.

    One does need to understand a bit about how electricity is described in relation to the driven appliance. In short, you have Amps and Volt, which when multiplied together gives you the wattage. So, a lamp run at 350mA (milliAmps) and a voltage of 10 consumes 3.5 Watts. (.35 x 10 = 3.5). This was not a real theme with previous lighting systems as they could only be run at a specific amperage, that which comes from the wall, mostly. LEDs are flexible in their requirements and show differences in efficiency at different current strengths. One doesn't need to understand all the fine detainls, but one should no longer use wattage as a reference, other than to get an idea of the power costs! LEDs are typically 50% more efficient than other light sources. A real savings.

    A third thing to know is they are dimmable in the extreme. By controlling the voltage, you can run them up and down the scale from totally off to full brightness. This allows you to completely control the intensity and, with various LED colours, you can create a desirable spectrum. Absolute controlability! The better LED lamps have this built right into the onboard computer, while other types can be controlled with a PWM (pulse-width modulator).

    Now, an item I find important and many others have very strong views about. Optics over the LEDs. This is an interesting area, but with lots of misinformation and misunderstanding of light optics. We have two main types of units on the market; those with optics(lenses, such as in AI, Sunpower, and others) or those without optics (such as Vertex). The idea for the optics was to concentrate the light as deeper aquariums need as much power as possible and a focussed light stays, theoretically, insode of the aquarium. Plus, if you want to hang your lamp more than a foot above the water, you need to bundle the light, as an LED has a 120°-125° light angle and will illuminate much of the room.

    Now, the other approach, which I willing tell you I much prefer, is to cluster the LEDs along the middle of the lamp axis and hang the lamp 6" over the water. Aesthetically much nicer, but one also has a softer lighting effect with less 'spotlighting' due to the optics, plus a strong 'glitterline' effect. Plus, other than what many will try to tell you, you actually manage to get more light into the tank than with the optics. (optics tend to loose 10-15% of the light directly due to the optic construction, while a clustered LED array tight over the water looses less than 10% due to light refraction/reflection).

    obviously, your own taste will help to make a decision, plus the pocketbook, as the hi-line fixtures are expensive to purchase, but, my Vertex Illumina SR260, due to the efficiency and no need to replace bulbs, will amortasize itself in less than 3 years. I don't know what power costs in SA, but I pay about 0.24€ per kwh. My previous lamp cost me €50 per month, my new one €24 and the LEDs will be with me for 10 years! I was quickly convinced.

    If you have any specific question, just shot 'em my way,

    Jamie
     
  13. lIghty

    lIghty

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    Correct, we are looking at lm/PAR per watt, Correct?


    Probably getting close to that, but still a while till it filters down to the market place.


    This is not quite true, is the current we are watching, not voltage as LEDS are CC(constant current) devices.


    Mmmm... well 99.9% of LED devices (well any decent devices) are driven with PWM, using a linear driving circuit would be defeating the object of trying to get better efficiency rating.


    Totally lost here! could you please elaborate.


    Again, lost.
     
  14. Kolognekoral

    Kolognekoral

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    The current Cree XP-G series produces 139lm per Watt. Higher than T5 or halide. You'll find them in Vertex products. Certainly some others by now.


    You're splitting hairs, as a constant current is a stabile amperage with a flexable voltage. If you were to change both you would change the efficiency of the LED drastically.


    Really splitting hairs. Get me a fuzz duster! ;) But correct!



    OK, this is the difficult part to explain. Most diy and subsequently most marketed models, placed the leds relatively evenly over the heatsink and attempted to cover most of the surface of the tank with this spread. For diy it made it easier to mount the leds, but we quickly noted that we were having light spill due to the wide angle of the led lens (120°-125°). Many opted for an optic to focus the light, few thought about placing the leds right next to each other and creating a point light source. Technically, this was tough for a diyer. Very fine work. It still is. But the optic made the looser spacing a good, if more expensive, option.

    In Germany we have quite a few companies clustering the leds and placing them toward the middle of the lamp, thus giving a 120° angle. Relatively wide, but no wider than a previous halide. This option does not require optics to bundle the light.

    Now, let me discuss optics a bit. They have clear advantages in that they bundle light into a much tighter beam, allowing the aquarist or other user to aim their photons! The first disadvantage is the loss of light an optic causes. They are typically plastik and are relatively rough in design (compared to a camera or telescope, in Ex). This causes a direct loss of up to 25% of the entering light. Most better optics can give between 85%-90% transparence. Still a lot of light loss. Also, when the light hits the water, we start getting reflection and refraction, which causes further light loss. Even though you are capable of focusing the light into a very tight beam, you will still have loss. Of course, this tight beam can then be hung 3ft over the tank, if that is the plan. A decision point.

    Another approach is to go without an optic, which immediately gives you more light entering the water. OK, as the led light angle is wide, the lamp should be about 15cm/6" above the water surface for best performance. I like this aesthetically, a personal decision. Now, light entering water is directly refracted, this would be with or without an optic. Water will reduce a 120° angle to about a 95% angle. Sort of an automatic focus. When the light hits the glass, it is further altered, with most of it being reflected into the tank and about a 10% loss to the outside. This will depend on the height of the lamp, as we can see, with the deeper the water, the greater the light loss, to a point, as this is not a linear loss, Light does not follow a straight line in water, it is constantly reflected and refracted. If you see this plotted, you do not get a perfect cone rather a tear shaped form.

    OK, what does this mean. Well, without optics you can actually get more light into the tank than with and without any spotlighting effect (when light is bundled via an optic, the cone of light is widening as it heads down. Parts of the tank will be more or less strongly lit, due to this and overlap of other optics.), which many find disturbing.

    In the end, one can balance the equation/decision in saying, optics give you greater variance in hanging height, but cost quite a bit mor money. They lower the light energy in general by more than 10%. Without optics the leds must be clustered to create a point light source toward the middle axis of the tank, which assures even light distribution and minimal light spill. To take advantage of this, the lamp must hang closer to the water surface for most tanks (rule of thumb, 6"/15cm above a 24"/60cm wide tank).

    Does this paint a better picture? :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: 11 Aug 2011
    Louis Scheepers likes this.
  15. lIghty

    lIghty

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    Mmmmmm....

    Well, first of all, its not about splitting hairs or getting a fuz duster! Facts are facts! ;)

    Well after seeing this thread it's quite apparent that you are obviously trying to promote your product?

    Vertex Illumina LED SR600 - Marine Aquariums of South Africa

    Perhaps you should contact the administrators of the site, and become a sponsor?

    IMO the above above statement is extremely misleading! Saying that "better lamps" have onboard computers, and implying that the "not so good" lamps use PWM. Does your lamp use PWM or not? :whistling:
     
  16. Dlaria

    Dlaria

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    I've tried to search youtube for reviews of the equipment I'm buying first.
     
  17. Kolognekoral

    Kolognekoral

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    I have no intentions of getting into an argument with you, so we can forget that right now! If you want to know more about me, before bashing about, read my intro thread. I am not hiding anything! I'm a pretty up-front kind of guy. Give it a chance.

    As to PWMs, almost all commercial units will be using them, either directly or as an accesorry for this purpose. There are advantages to the PWM vs the analog modulator (pot), as they are a better mate to computer systems. I previously found the analog interesting, as it is like a slide scale and changes the current, however, this has recently been associated with stressing the led over the years. I can't call that at this point, too soon, but this would come back to constant current. The PWM system works by a sort of interval flashing of the current, it doesn't change the charge rather changes the rate of its delivery. maybe you already know this.
     
  18. Falcon

    Falcon

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    139lm/watt
     
  19. Kolognekoral

    Kolognekoral

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    Opps, my bad! Thanks for getting that!
     
    Last edited: 11 Aug 2011
  20. Elv

    Elv

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  21. belindamotion

    belindamotion Thread Starter Google Master

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    The Panorama Retro 36..these look excellent, saw them on a RSS Feed..
    [​IMG]

    Panorama LED Dimmable Retrofit 2D


    • LED Color spectrum: 24x10,000K White & 12x453nm Actinic Blue
    • Dimensions: 8” x 9.5” x 2.5”H (20.32 x 24.13 x 6.35cm)
    • Input Voltage: 24VDC
    • Watts consumed: 42w
    • Cable Length: 48”
    • LED driver: UL/cUL/CE Approved 120/240V, 50/60Hz.
    • Optics: 70 degree Panel Lenses
    • Dimmer Specs: 0-10V

    Read more: Panorama LED Dimmable Retrofit 2D
     
    Last edited: 13 Aug 2011
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