Corals for use of nutrients export

Discussion in 'Coral Care and Requirements' started by LuckyFish, 19 Oct 2011.

  1. LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    Guys, I need to pick your brains.

    Which corals could be used best as nutrients exporter?

    I can imagine xenia would be a good one.
    What about rics?
    What about star polyps?
    Any other corals who suck nutrients out of the water?
     
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  3. Dane

    Dane

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    I have wondered this as well... But bear in mind that corals have an active metabolism with waste products, so inherently not necessarily as good as plants in sequestering waste products.

    Xenia grow incredibly fast, although I think star polyps - the encrusting gorgonian kind with the frilly tentacles, not the normal star polyps, would be your best best. I have never seen anything grow as quickly as the brown or green star polyps in my tank, frankly phenomenal.

    I don't think you'd get the growth rates you'd like with rics. Maybe other shrooms tho? Thing about shrooms and pulsing xenia, a lot of their volume is liquid, which doesn't necessarily mean they are growing that much and sequestering nutrients....?
     
    Last edited: 19 Oct 2011
  4. 459b

    459b Moderator

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    xenia have been used before. They dont export as fast as macro algae though.
    Rics are too slow growing to be of any use.
     
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  5. viper357

    viper357 Admin MASA Contributor

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    Although not corals, Clams are excellent at filtering water, a bit expensive though as you would need a good few, also an 'aiptasia raceway' is very efficient, apparently.
     
    Last edited: 19 Oct 2011
  6. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    The idea is actually to use the wasted space of a broodstock system. I mean keeping two fish in a footprint of 400 x 500mm and 100 litre water is a waste. On top of it, these two fish eat such a huge amount of food and produce a lot of waste products. So co-culturing something attractive and maybe valuable as well, would make sense.
     
  7. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    I know, but selling macro algae or xenias is not fun at all.:(
     
  8. pXius

    pXius

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    I've actually read around on this topic and like the above posts said, algae is much more effective at removing nutrients.

    The concept of having say a huge xenia colony in a system with say no sump and a hang on skimmer would obviously be beneficial and would probably be something you see in a freshwater tank that has been converted to marine.

    May I ask what you are trying to achieve or is it simply just random thought? :D
     
  9. pXius

    pXius

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    Never mind I'm slow...
     
  10. pXius

    pXius

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    I've always wondered about mussels and marine systems... can they beneficially be incorporated with one another?
     
  11. 459b

    459b Moderator

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    zoas might survive and thrive in your broodstock tanks.
     
  12. viper357

    viper357 Admin MASA Contributor

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    So clams and aiptasia are out then. :p
     
  13. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    In mine at the moment, only fish will survive. But after the move, the broodstock system will be fine and I want to keep it that way. Macro algae I could try in anyway, but if I can co-culture something with some value, it would be better.;)
     
  14. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    Sort of...;)
     
  15. pXius

    pXius

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    Turning "I want to save money" Into making some money will probably not be easy in such a system. Maybe find some blue xenias. At least they're a bit more rare and less demanding in terms of light etc compared to say... clams.
     
  16. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    Blue xenias sounds good. I also want the short white ones. They pump like mad.
     
  17. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator

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    i dont see clams being to hard, i think we under-rate their hardiness
    and for a number of reasons i think you would be perfect for trying this in a total artificial environment
     

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  18. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    Thanks for posting. Very good read and maybe worth a try.
    What makes you think, I should be perfect to try this? I'm sure you considered culturing clams as well. Did you?
     
  19. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator

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    I have and maybe dec/jan will take it further

    Well your passion, knowledge, perserverence and dedication is something i think could get you to be the first at aquacultured clams, instead of maricultured.
     
  20. OP
    LuckyFish

    LuckyFish

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    Thanks for the compliment, Dallas. Problem is, they can be sold only at the age of 1 to 2 years. On the other hand, once settled, they don't need much attention and could fill a couple of square meters of broodstock tanks.

    I have so many ideas at this stage, I first need to get my passion back, my permits sorted out and some cash in.
     
  21. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator

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    Well ur passion got me setting up some tanks for banghais breeding

    Shout if u need anything
     
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