What is Cyano?

Discussion in 'Beginner Discussions' started by Tobes, 5 Feb 2008.

  1. Tobes

    Tobes Retired Moderator

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    Hello there! Questions: What is CYANO BACTERIA? How do you notice/pick it up? What causes it?

    I wait in anticipation...
     
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  3. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Hi Tobes - I hope that I can help:
    - It is a bacteria growth, as the name suggests
    - it is wine red to purple-red in color...
    - it is slimy, and reasonably easily "blown off" from it's location (it you use a power-head or a turkey baster)

    It lives on nitrates/phosphates and a carbon source (could be detritus or too much food that's rotting in the tank).....

    It is said that it also only grows where there is not enough flow in one's tank.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Kanga

    Kanga Retired Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Last edited by a moderator: 5 Feb 2008
  5. Mike

    Mike Retired Moderator

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    Cyanobacteria family are one of the oldest, largest and most important groups of known bacteria. Cyanobacteria are an aquatic, photosynthetic bacteria that manufacture their own food and live in colonies -- large enough for you to see them!

    Many Proterozoic oil deposits are attributed to the activity of cyanobacteria and are important providers of nitrogen fertilizer in the cultivation of rice and beans and have been important in shaping the course of evolution and ecological change throughout earth's history. Even the oxygen atmosphere that life as we know it depends on was generated by numerous cyanobacteria during the Archaean and Proterozoic Eras. Even the chloroplast with which plants make food for themselves is actually a cyanobacterium living within the plant's cells. Because Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic and aquatic, cyanobacteria are often called "blue-green algae", but are NOT an Algae.
    Causes Of Cyano
    It seems that a nutrient rich water problem is the prime culprit. Not that the Cyano is eating left over food particles, but left over food particles are breaking down into harmful excess nutrients. Add Light plus dissolved organic carbon/organic material, and you have a great recipe for the preferred Eco-System of CyanoBacteria.


    NOTE:


    It is good to know that Poor Water Husbandry is usually the culprit in most "problems" that develop in the Marine and Tropical Eco-System.
    It is said that the Red Nightmare is caused from Phosphates and Silicates in the water column. But it is not that simple. We have seen cases develop from Old Bulbs or a Lack Of Good Water Flow .. but we have never seen that the addition of a correction of these two "causes" ever made the Cyano go away.
    In fact, we had two cases of outbreak where the systems were absent of Phosphates and Silicates, they also had new Halides, Actinic's and Great Water Flow. What was surely something to think about was the fact that we had switched to a new Flake Food. Another factor is that we have never had an outbreak unless the system housed FISH ... and they were being FED!


    i hope this helps, i borrowed it from here;-

    Reef Show - CYANO BACTERIA: red-slime algae? Cause and Relief
     
  6. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Cool! Thanks Kanga / Wee-Man for the decent answers....
     
  7. Mike

    Mike Retired Moderator

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    Thank Google:thumbup:
     
  8. Kanga

    Kanga Retired Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Thanks Dragonreef and MASApedia.:thumbup:

    Jacques your reply wasnt half bad either:thumbup:
     
  9. Tobes

    Tobes Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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    Thanks guys, I saw it before in my old tank and was told it is Red slime algae - clearly not!! Thanks for that Weeman. Just got worried when I read "cyano", thought it might be some "marine-aids-virus" or something....
     
  10. Alfie

    Alfie

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    Always inreresting how the cause and treatment differs in opinion. Book by Julian Sprung "Algae" A problem solver.
    "Cyanobacteria a.k.a. blue-green algae are aquatic photisynthetic bacteria that left the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old. Oxygen generated by cyanobacteriashaped the coarse of evolution and ecological change on earth, and endosymbiosis by cyanobacteria within eukaryotic cells is responsible for the development of higher plants. Furthermore, cyanobacteria are one of the very few organisms that convert atmospheric nitrogen into nitrate or amonia, which are utilised by plants. Cyanoacteria form symbiotic relationships with other organisms, and with fungi they form complex symbiotic organisms known as lichens.

    Blue greens are the only algal group that has prokaryotic cellular organization. that they have chlorophyll a and produce oxygen via photosynthesis distinguishes them fro other prokaryotic autoghraphs, and this is the reason they are often referred to as algae. Nevertheless cyanobacteria are related to only the cholroplast within eukaryotic algae. Blue-green algae may occur as single cells, colonies of single cells, or filamentous cell chains, often surrounded by a gelatinous mucilaginous sheath. They do not have sexual reproduction, but under unfavourable conditions, they produce specialized thickened cells called akinetes that are full of food reserves.

    Blue-green algae get their colour from the phycobiliprotein known as phycocyanin, though some species are purple or reddish due to pigment phycoerythrin. their colour is variable depending on the abundance of one pigment or onother, which is affected by light spectrum and intensity.

    Some cyanobacteria are capable of movement. Oscillatoria, for example, gets its name from the "swaying" motion of its filaments.

    The cyanobacterium Spirulina, now a popular "health food," has long been valued for its high protein content, and ease of cultivation in ponds. Many other cyanobactera are toxic to humans and animals. Aquarists call cyano bacteria slime algae and consider them a nuisance."

    I will post his cause and treatment shortly for the different types of cyanobcteria.
     
  11. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Unbelievable Alfie - what I do know is that the cyano is indeed one of the oldest bacteria forms, AND that it can indeed convert ammonia into nitrites and also nitrites into nitrates.... I am not TOO sure about ANYTHING into oxygen though. BUT who am I to contest this.....
    BUT for the rest, is the info you posted really interesting....

    Just as interesting is the fact that the information differs so much!
     
  12. Alfie

    Alfie

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    Here are extracts of from the book.

    Lyngbya(Common name) Hair Algae

    Desirable/Undesirable features: Not palatable to many herbivores. Not very fasr growing. Lyngbya spp. sometimes bloom in older aquariums, usually under nutrient-poor conditions.

    Herbivores: Diadema.

    Phorimidium

    Desirable/undesirable features: Not palatable to many herbivores. Very fast growing. This alga sometimes blooms in aquariums, usually under nutrient-poor conditions. May smother corals and damage coral tissue on contact. "Black Band Disease" in corals involves attack of coral tissue by a phorimidium species. The occurance of phorimidium in aquariums seem to limit the occurance of Derbesia, or the change of nutrient concentration in the aquarium may be marked by a transition from Derbesia to phorimidium.

    Controls: Strong water flow to physically prevent growth on coral. Remove by hand or syphon. Higher food inputs to encourage stronger coral growth.

    Herbivores: Hermit crabs such as Clibanarius tricolour.

    Oscillatoria: Slime Algae

    Desirable/undesirable features: Not palatable to many herbivores. Very fast growing. A red form of this geus sometimes blooms in aquariums, usually under organic nutrient-rich conditions. A bright green form is common on aquarium lids and in nutrient rich aquariums.

    Controls: Herbivores, strong water flow to prevent growth on sand. Use of protein skimming, activated carbon, ozone, strong water flow or other means of increasing redox potential of the water and reducing the accumulation of dissolved organic compounds. Elevate alkilinity.

    Herbivores: Hermit crabs such as Clibanarius tricolour, some Aplysia sp.,Bursatella, Strombus alatus and turban snails. Ctenochaetus spp.
     
    Last edited: 6 Feb 2008
  13. Alfie

    Alfie

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    What is interesting here is what grows under different nutrient conditions. Some arenutrient-poor and other nutrient-rich.
     
  14. tahiriqbal

    tahiriqbal

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    Excellent reading +1
     
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