Water movement too much?

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I have a 70 gal. tank.
I have two medium sized power heads (900L/h each), one fluval 404 (1300L/h), and one fluval 204 (680L/h). I added the first fish to the tank about a week ago - two clown fish. I have noticed that during the two load shedding times we have had this week, the clowns seem more comfortable when there is little or no water movement. In fact, the only time I have seen them playing in the anemone and swimming around the tank is when the water movement was zero thanks to no power.
Currently there is water movement over most of the tank in some way or another. It is not that strong (imo). Any ideas?
 

viper357

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Welcome to the forum.

Don't judge your water flow according to your clown fish, they have a rather odd swimming behaviour.
 

Quinton

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Corals like flow speeds between 5 cm/s and 40 cm/s, depending on the polyp size. As a rule of thump, larger polyps prefer slower flow rates (see research by Dai and Lin in 1993, also paragraph 7 of http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/mar2002/toonen.htm )

As for fish, I'm not too sure but I'd assume that they'd be happy in similar flow rates.

Another number that gets bandied about quite a bit is the number of times you turn over your total water volume - 10x - 30x per hour seems to be a commonly recommended range. So for your +- 300 litre tank, 9000 litres per hour would not be excessive. It sounds like you have less than 4000 litres per hour, so it doesn't sound over the top.
 

Ocean

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You say you have a nennie, nennies require lots of water flow so your doingg the right thing.
BTW 9000 would be a little over the top on his tank
 
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i've got two 3000 Aqua Medics in my 300l tank which then amounts to 24 times water movement, but seems to blow the living shit out of my tank.

substate moves everywhere so have decided to remove 1.
 
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I'd reckon it might not be te flow as such that is too much, but rather the type of flow. Power heads produces narrow laminar flow as opposed to random turbulence. Random turbulence or a wave motion, is the preferred flow in a reef eviroment.

I'd suggest that you maybe point the powerheads so that the flow from them bounce off the aquarium glass. The should produce flow that is better suited to your fare.

Hence the reason why more and more aquarists opt for products like tunze streams, SEIO's or Vortech pumps.

My 2c

Wikus
 
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I'd reckon it might not be te flow as such that is too much, but rather the type of flow. Power heads produces narrow laminar flow as opposed to random turbulence. Random turbulence or a wave motion, is the preferred flow in a reef eviroment.

I'd suggest that you maybe point the powerheads so that the flow from them bounce off the aquarium glass. The should produce flow that is better suited to your fare.

Hence the reason why more and more aquarists opt for products like tunze streams, SEIO's or Vortech pumps.

My 2c

Wikus
Agree with Wikus. Their is a use difference between powerheads and streamers. You can also use Boyu wavemakers they have a good dispersement of flow. Their controllers are a lot cheaper and better settings than the Seio's.
 
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can we backtrack to the fluvals?! arent these like a REALLY bad idea for marine tanks (millie said so once)
 
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can we backtrack to the fluvals?! arent these like a REALLY bad idea for marine tanks (millie said so once)

They are bad if not maintained meticiously (spelling eek :p) If you do not keep em clean they could become nitrate factories, anyways that is my limited experience with most of the cannister filter types.

However they are perfectly fin to use to polish water, run carbon or any of the other chemical means of reducing unwanted stuff in the water.

Hope this make sense, cause I'm still half a sleep :p
 
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they seem to do a good job at removing detritus but you need to clean them quite often as they collect a lot of stuff.

I feel that seios and these aqua medics would compliment each other quite well in a bigger tank.
 
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Thanks for the replies. Strangely after some days of "false starts" the clowns suddenly seem fine. Even though they had found the anemone a few days ago, they suddenly out of the blue "rediscovered" it and are swimming in and around it fine. They have also taken to swimming around a bit more of the tank as well and eating well.

Yes, the fluvals are the only filters in the tank besides a skimmer, and Live Rock (which I don't really know how much of the tank volume it takes up). Maybe just less than a quarter of the tank is LR? Not sure. I have spent about 12 years with Tropical fish, hence the fluvals. Space was a bit of an issue for adding a sump, so I decided to try without it. Honestly, I wish I had been able to go the sump route... if not for anything but to get rid of the blastered oily film that comes onto the water surface. It never really seemed to bug me in my Tropical days... until now.
 
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Try putting your power heads facing each other closer to the surface of the water so that it creates surface turbulence to get rid of the film.
 

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