Up Close and personal

Kanga

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Hey Guys and Gals

After reading one of Sihaya's posts about using a Microscope to have a peek at the live sand in our tanks it got me thinking and googling.

I have found this and promptly ordered it http://www.gadgetman.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=MAN1000

Now I had a choice I could get a normal 600X microscope for the same price look at my sand and go WTF?
or have this USB one with 200X post the pic and go "hey MASA WTF?" and share what i see.

I am picking it up this morning between D Day suit fittings and a function this afternoon, but by tonight if all goes well we should have some close ups of my sand.

What do you guys think? I am mad? (ok ok dont answer):whistling:
 

viper357

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You mad hatter you :p

Looks great, looking forward to some awesome pics, but not just of your sand, corals too, maybe even the teeth on your sailfin :)
 

Rory

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That thing looks really cool! Looking forward to some cool pictures...
 

moz

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I'll think I'll have to get my self one of those. You could hook the microscope up permanently to a PC, display it on a large monitor and invent a whole new type of tank, a femto or atto reef, or maybe we could just call it a Kanga reef:thumbup:
 
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Hey, great link, thanks for posting...

Some time ago Intel had a digital microscope on the market - really aimed at kids, but I thought that it could come in handy, and bought one for the tank :)

It did not perform very well (had plastic lenses, and a very bad table) and the software was *really* irritating, with funny sounds, etc. I took it apart after about one week, and just never bothered to re-assemble it...

I've been using a real microscope for some years now, and yes, it opens up a new world for you - it also helps to put many of the reef-keeping practices and theory into a new perspective. I can really recommend one to anyone really keen about this hobby. I would, however, recommend buying a binocular dissection microscope instead of the usual monocular one.

Here are some photos I've taken using a normal digital camera and my cheap monocular microscope...

Diatom algae

Micro%2015.jpg


Small critters (copepods) amongst a Caulerpa leaf

Micro%208.jpg


Unknown critter busy eating detritus

Micro%206.jpg


Bristle worm larvae

Micro%205.jpg


Copepod

Micro%2013.jpg


Copepod close up (x400)

Micro%2014.jpg


Flat worm & micro starfish

Micro%2017.jpg


Live sand

Live%20sand%201.jpg


Close up of sand grain - note how rounded it is, and the microscopic algae growing on it.

Live%20sand%202.jpg



Hennie
 

Rory

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Awesome pics hennie.

At my work we use Axiocam on a normal microscope. It's pretty awesome software. No idea how much it costs but I imagine a LOT.
 

Kanga

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Hey man Hennie those are awesome, my 200X is feels a little small:blushing: I have Microscope envy, I already realise I need something bigger, at least the software is plain and simple But yes this is a toy interesting and good fun but little more than a digital magnifying glass.

"Bristle worm" on live rock


Mollusk from underneath
underneath.jpg

From the top

inside my Durso
 

Kanga

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Green sponge I have in my tank

Broken Monti

Dodgy Algea growing on one of my rocks

Pod



Will post more as I play
 
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Dodgy Algea growing on one of my rocks
That's Halimeda, a very desirable macro algae. They incorporate calcium in their "leaves", and can really suck calcium and alkalinity from your water, but apart from that they are quite beneficial, and as they only grow in very good water they are good indicators of water quality. The easyest way to get rid of them if you want to, is to introduce an urchin - they just love Halimeda...

Hennie
 

Kanga

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That's Halimeda, a very desirable macro algae. They incorporate calcium in their "leaves", and can really suck calcium and alkalinity from your water, but apart from that they are quite beneficial, and as they only grow in very good water they are good indicators of water quality. The easyest way to get rid of them if you want to, is to introduce an urchin - they just love Halimeda...

Hennie
WOW thanks Hennie
 
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Awesome guy's

Kanga = Gill Grisholm ?

Hennie = Horacio Caine

MASA's own RSI (Reef Scene Investigators) :D
 

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