The helping thread

Discussion in 'Beginner Discussions' started by Dikdaan, 5 Jan 2011.

  1. Dikdaan

    Dikdaan

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    Hi all

    I am doing some reading again... The intention of this thread is to ask questions and get a better insight on topics. Either give info about the question or add links to previous threads please.

    First question is: What causes high nitrates and whats the effects of it?
     
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  3. Manic

    Manic Moderator

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    High nitrates are caused by decomposition. This can either be due to overstocking of fish which leads to fish poo that decomposes or can be caused by over feeding and the uneaten food decomposes. Usually your filtration system will convert the initial ammonia into nitrites and then finally into nitrates. If your filtration system is mature then the nitrates will be further brocken down to nitrogen and it then leaves the system. At least that is how I understand it.
     
  4. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    As Manic said, over feeding and over pooping

    Nitrates = end result of aerobic bacteria consumption. Be that the top layer of the DSB, or bio-balls or hair curlers (some kio filters have that). Basically any surface that can covered by beneficial bacteria. Even sponge filters.

    More insight
    Vipers pic, (thanks :whistling:)
    [​IMG]
     
  5. magman

    magman

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    I think nitrates are needed for a system to sustain it self at a low level, I think up to 5, I think even sps even need a low level of nitrates, where as softies love the poo a bit more, was there not some sps guy on reefcentral who had a problem with all his sps dying from the constant 0 nitrates?

    What are the levels of nitrates in a tank, I think it was 30-40 becomes toxic for corals.
     
  6. Manic

    Manic Moderator

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    I have had a whole tank crash due to undetectable levels of nitrates
     
  7. magman

    magman

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    what is the toxic levels for corals?
     
  8. Manic

    Manic Moderator

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    I think for most easy to keep soft corals it is around 50. I kept my ric tanks at 30 to make them grow faster.
     
  9. cassie1

    cassie1

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    what can be done to bring down the nitrate level a bit. will it help to do a water change? i have the same problem. mine is at 40 at the moment
     
  10. sweetnsour

    sweetnsour

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    Guys this may sound strange but I'd thought I'd add my 2c, before my cube when neozeo I had nitrate levels of 100 and all my sps were still perfectly fine and colouration was actually insane.

    Honesly IMHO don't chase figures if you keep you parameters stable it shouldn't become a problem.

    But as the guys have said maybe try and get them lower and then just try and maintain it there no need for 0 figures everywhere its just too sterile.
     
  11. magman

    magman

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    shot bud, and the acro's etc, the fussier sps, am I correct in that 5 they need, and 10 is overboard?
     
  12. Manic

    Manic Moderator

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    At 10 they will be fine. Actually they would be easier to keep at this level but they will brown out. Anything below 5 and the colours start to come out.
     
  13. Dikdaan

    Dikdaan Thread Starter

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    thanks for all the insight. I will still run this question for the day and then add the second question tomorrow...

    Does any one have some links to usefull info on high nitrates or something thats a good read like an article?
     
  14. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Very detailed :thumbup:, only i didnt know the 2 of the 7 little dwarfs lived in the DSB :lol:
     
  15. Dikdaan

    Dikdaan Thread Starter

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    Here's what Marius said on another forum:
    To be more specific, the bioload is too big for the last phase of the nitrogen cycle where the NO3 gets broken down into nitrogen gas. The filtration system handled the beak down of the crap to ammonia/nitrite and then nitrate but cant perform the last step fast enough. The ways to remove nitrate are through nitrate reductors, matured DSB or other forms like algae scrubbers. Liverock also removed nitrate as the insides of the rock form anearobic areas. Water changes will also take care of nitrate but you you would need to do this on a very regular basis if it is the main way to get rid f it.

    All the nitrate is converted to gas via denitrifying bacteria. This bacteria occurs in areas where there is very little to no oxygen present. These areas are the botton of a DSB or the inside of liverock.

    A skimmer is mechanical filtration and the way that it helps with nitrates is that it removes stuff from the watercolumn before it even starts to break down to ammonia/nitrite/nitrate. A skimmer does not remove nitrate but prevents it from forming by removing the source. The bigger the skimmer the more crap will be removed from the tank before it can decay and go into the nitrogen cycle.
     
  16. Dikdaan

    Dikdaan Thread Starter

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    Question 2 - LR

    What does LR do in the setup and how much is needed for a setup (kg per liter)
     
  17. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    LR is plays the role of a bacteria host, from aerobic to anaerobic, it also has the benefits of adding bio-diversity as well if nicely cured etc.

    there are some calc out there, but go for what you can afford. adding the cheap LR rubble in your sump and nice viewable pieces to your DT. The more the better
     
  18. magman

    magman

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    LR hosts beneficial bacteria that convert ammonia to nitrites, nitrites to nitrates, and nitrates to nitrogen.

    LR also hosts and introduces to the aquarium many other kinds of beneficial creatures, such as worms, stars, copepods etc, that all contribute to the cleaning on a tank.

    It also provides a lakka look, especially when encrusted with coraline.

    It provides fish with a place to feel secure.

    How much is needed depends on the individual, some people substitute LR with made rock (bio rock), and then the made bio rock becomes seeded from the LR and hosts the beneficial LR too.
     
  19. Dikdaan

    Dikdaan Thread Starter

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    How long does it take the bio rock to become LR and have the benefits that LR has?
     
  20. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    from a bacteria point of view, from minutes to days, to weeks, all depends on what the environment is like for bacteria to populate...
    as for the algaes etc, a few weeks or less
     
  21. magman

    magman

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    I think most would say 6 months, but IMO, put it in for a few hours, and the beneficial bacteria will host in it, it just then needs to be fed and multiplied. The beneficial bacteria is more important than the pods etc.
     
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