Sexual Reproduction Info

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Hello friends,

As I've mentioned, I'm very interested/fascinated by sexual reproduction of marine inverts in captivity/aquariums. So much so that I've spent much time browsing/gathering info from articles, sites, forums, etc. on captive spawning and sexual reproduction of marine inverts. And these are are ASIRA here:

For corals/cnidarians:
www.asira.org/breedchart1.htm

For other marine inverts:
http://www.asira.org/breedchart2.htm

I'm always working on adding more info to these charts and adding more to this "article"/webpage: www.asira.org - Sexual Reproduction

Thus, if anyone has any experience/info to share add to any of these, PLEASE do post it here and/or email/PM me. I will be ever so delighted/grateful! :)

Sara
 
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Hmm, yeah, I need to elaborate there (site is still very new). UV sterilizers typically kill the really teeny tiny stuff (free floating algae, viruses, bacteria, etc.) more so than the larger stuff. But I assume it depends on the type of larvae in particular. I would think that they would generally harm gametes more than larvae. But it's hard to say generally... I just wouldn't use one if you're trying to breed inverts (just to be safe) unless you knew that it wouldn't harm the gametes/larvae of whatever you're trying to breed. If someone else has more in-depth knowledge of these things (for specific types of animals), I hope they will chime in.
 
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Thanks- one of the frustrating things I see about all this is that so many people don't even know when their corals are spawning. Some people actually think they're something terribly wrong with their animals when this happens. There was one woman who wrote into WWM who's Euphyllia was spawning in her nano tank (unbelievable!) and (if I remember correctly) she thought her tank had been invaded by some kind of parasite because the planulae look like worms. Meanwhile, I'm so happy excited I can hardly type a response back to her!

I just wish there was more I could do to make these things more general knowledge so that people at least know when they happen... that's the first step.
 

coralite

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In late summer of 06 I worked in Parguera Puerto Rico as a coral spawning intern. I wrote about my experiences in this reefkeeping article. I worked for Dr. Alina Szmant who more or less figured out most of what we know about coral spawning of Carribean corals, I also interviewed her about sexual coral reproduction to produce this podcast, available as a free download. Finally, here is a video of a Favia fragum planula swimming around in a drop of water. Hope you like it!
 
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Whoa!! Very cool all around... but I LOVE that planulae video. Awesome! I like how you did that from below... very effective and a little "tripy" too. :)
 
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In late summer of 06 I worked in Parguera Puerto Rico as a coral spawning intern. I wrote about my experiences in this reefkeeping article. I worked for Dr. Alina Szmant who more or less figured out most of what we know about coral spawning of Carribean corals, I also interviewed her about sexual coral reproduction to produce this podcast, available as a free download.
Blue Blistering Barnacles. Just finished reading about your work experience in Puerto Rico. Fantastic Jake. I found it intriguing that " coral larvae can sense biological cues to settlement (Morse et al, 1996), the experimentally conditioned blocks were used to see the community effects on coral settlement and survivorship".
Were these facts reconfirmed after the spawning.
 

coralite

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When we looked at the settling pattern of Acropora palmata it was pretty clear that regardless of how the block was conditioned, they larvae preferred the bottoms of the blocks by a large margin, sometimes they would settle on the sides but they would never settle on the top. So why would a high light, high flow coral prefer to grow on the least illuminated part of the block? Could be an artifact of the experiment but this has been corroborated in the wild with other photosynthetic stony coral species. Who knows. . .
 
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This might sound stupid... but could it be that it's not so much "looking" for low-flow, low-light as looking for a crack to settle in? Maybe it can get a "better grip" and be safer (temporarily) in a crack than on top, exposed where the flow is strongest?
 

coralite

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Although it has been shown that coral larvae prefer to settle in cracks and fissures, they will still always pick those on the underside of a block over any other side.
 
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Huh... how curious. Now I am remember Lee Goldman talking about this during one of his MACNA lectures... it is puzzling for sure.
 

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Wow, that's an intense article, thanks for the link.
 
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Great read once again. Thanks Sarah. Found myself lost in all the links for most of the evening. Time well spent.:)
 

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