Seriously green

Discussion in 'New Members' started by Elaine, 31 May 2012.

  1. Elaine

    Elaine

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    Hi guys! Im new to marine tanks, so I'm green, but also green with envy when I look at all the TOTM!
    I'm researching now so I can buy my tank etc, but wow, as I'm reading more and more, I'm getting seriously intimidated!
    What is a good size of tank to buy for a beginner, without having to change size again in the near future. (aim is to eventually have a nice reef tank)
     
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  3. Wes

    Wes

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    :welcome6:
     
  4. belindamotion

    belindamotion Google Master

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    :welcometomasa2:to MASA...:1:
     
  5. JsPLAYn

    JsPLAYn

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    1.2x600x600 perfect size for space and perfect for beginners,and its a size that'll definately keep you entertained for long

    oh and welcometomasa
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 31 May 2012
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  6. crispin

    crispin

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    welcome to masa Elaine, its great to have you join.

    in no time at all you will have a tank to be proud of and we have lots of members that love to share their knowledhe and help others so all those beautiful tanks you are envious of now, soon become your mentors:)

    tank size was a realy BIG question for me when I first started out, as was ways to keep the cost down and where to spend my hard earned cash. I sumerized the process i went through in another thread A summary of a beginnners sharp learning curve - Marine Aquariums of South Africa which you can read through later. For me I found that a 1.8m tank (1000l overall system) was brilliant to start off with and the fact that the same tank is still with me 4 years later is a testiment that it was the right choice. With larger tanks you get larger water vollume and that means things change slower over time and thus while you are still trying to work out the basics you have time to react. Nano's or small vollume tanks need immence care to be run well and are actually far harder to keep than bigger tanks. Bigger tanks also have better equipment to run them and that makes life alot easier too. Besides you have a greater variety of life you can place in bigger tanks, a greater selection of fish that do well and better corals.

    my advice would be to get a tank as big as you can afford. Both in space and for your pocket.

    If you plan and buy once and get it right you save LOTS of money. the guys that have to swap and change tanks often end up spending a fortune simply because they didnt decide what was right to start with and stick to it.
     
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  7. JsPLAYn

    JsPLAYn

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    alot easier only if you spend a huge fortune on automating just about everything.huge drums for water changes etc and equipment costs for that size is thru the roof,wereas the size i recommended actually come highly recommended by many as its in a decent water literage and equipment is decently prices for that size setup and best of all,water changes are a breeze... so its entirely up to what you willing to spend,coz big is beatifull,i had a big tank too, but geez does it rape your wallet
     
  8. crispin

    crispin

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    well actually no. i have two 800l systems which run on LR decent skimmers and atu. Near zero automation but i have time and i work at home so I save the cost and do it manually. Automation has fantastic advantages and it does cost more, but the point I am making is that bigger tanks are easier to run, especially for a bigginner and it IS easier to get a decent skimmer for a 800l system than it is to get one for a 250l system.

    i am sure that 2m tank of yours raped your wallet and put massive strain on your family life, but then again you and I keep reefs differently.

    Plan right, buy corectly and minimise your mistakes and it saves you alot of money.
     
  9. crispin

    crispin

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    i thought id go back to where i started out as i had the same questions and found the first thread i ever did. Its all about 'does size count' and interesting to take my own personal opinions out of it and see what the likes of kanga and JaquesB etc etc had to say back then. Its advice that stood me in good stead and perhaps it would be of use to others too....

    A new tank to start or an established system - Marine Aquariums of South Africa
     
  10. mytank

    mytank

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    Welcome @eline we are here to make your tank the TOTM :) just ask which ever question you might want answered and you have some BRILLIANT people here to teach you!
     
  11. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Welcome to MASA
     
  12. Tobes

    Tobes Retired Moderator

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    Hi there, welcome to MASA :)
     
  13. EFJ

    EFJ MASA Contributor

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    Hi and welcome to MASA. I agree with @crispin that you should look at going as big as what your pocket allows you. Just a tip first look at what you want to keep and then what equipment you want to use (what you can afford) and then work around that to see what size tank you can have. Also remember that if you want to run a sump (which is highly recommended) that it is basically a second tank. Take your time it will be well worth it. :thumbup:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  14. Albert Terego

    Albert Terego

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    Bigger is definitely a lot easier - about 500litres system volume minimum (including sump volume) is a decent size to begin with - go bigger if you have the space.

    I really would not recommend nano's or other smaller tanks for a beginner. It sounds counter-intuitive but a small tank is really a lot more work and because bad things happen a lot more quickly - giving you very little time to take action. When you are inexperienced this will be a killer.
     
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