Seeding dead rock in rockpools

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by Dane, 13 Apr 2010.

  1. Dane

    Dane

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    Hey all,

    If this were hypothetically speaking legal, or if one were able to get a permit for this, what do you think the results would be?

    Obviously one would hypothetically have to boil the rocks nice and long to make sure there are no nasties before dropping them off in a local shallow rockpool.

    Surely they'd get nice crustose and goggas? Anyone heard of a hypothetical situation wherein such an experiment was performed? Hypothetically, of course.

    Hypothetically, would rockpools species (able to tolerate a massive range in temp, salinity etc) even on the cape town coast (warmer side) be able to colonise it and do ok in a tropical tank? (bacteria, macro, pods etc).

    d
     
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  3. manta

    manta

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    i dont know, but theorectically you are not harvesting live rock are you. I have read somewhere that there are companies that mature/cure bio in the sea. I would think that if you placed it there it should not be a problem with taking it out later again.

    But then what do we know the peeps frm MCM would probaly have a different view.
     
  4. Dane

    Dane Thread Starter

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    Thanks manta,

    They would have a different view, and for good reason. How could they ever control unscrupulous reefers. What if someone were to take their piece of average looking live rock without sterilising it first and place it in a rock pool. The amount of aliens organisms introduced from international waters would be massive... Marine alien invasions are a serious threat to national biodiversity... In an aqueous medium it is SO much harder to control. planktonic larvae allow for rapid dispersal... its just a list of bad news. Hence the "hyoptheticallity" of this question... ;-)
     
  5. Neil H

    Neil H Moderator MASA Contributor

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    it is done around the world with great success and i think should be encouraged legally of course in many other parts of the world

    I also however think there is all but bugger all use in seeding the liverock in a cold water system and thinking you will have lots of bacteria in a warm water system.... they are too different in their natural conditions.... but hell i may be worng ..
     
  6. Pistolshrimp

    Pistolshrimp

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    You know although mcm rules state that you are not allowed to collect hard corals, it does not state any where that you are not allowed to take dead coral skeletons which i may add is what most of our local liverock is, i have friends and i as well, that have collected rubble rock and used it tanks, i dont think it would be illegal putting dry rock in the ocean to be seeded, but this is sa after all, somebody can correct me if im wrong
     
  7. Dane

    Dane Thread Starter

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    SA has pretty scary tough biodiversity protection legislation, however this is seldom enforced. Thats my overall impression of it, but I'm not intimately familiar with the documents.

    @NeilH - I completely agree with the unlikely survival of cold water species in warm water temps. However rock pools are a very different kettle of fish :p Temperatures in rock pools - especially those higher up the shoreline, vary massively. Ranging from far above your average tropical reef to typical cold coast temps. On top of this rockpool species must survive depletion of C02 and a host of other problems. So there should be some rockpool species on the warm side of cape town that can easily survive in tropical conditions...

    Heres one of the golden oldie papers by Charles Griffiths (one of my lecturers!) and co on flux in conditions of rockpools:

    http://www.int-res.com/articles/meps/29/m029p189.pdf
     
  8. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Yes, its done worldwide, especially around Florida Keys.
    And on Natal coast it will work

    Only problem/s we have, our seas is too ruff. I doubt if you will find it where you left it.

    And this is South Africa, somebody will steal it before you can take it out...:(
     
  9. Dane

    Dane Thread Starter

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    Ah! Valid point! On both the rough seas and the vandalism! Mleh!
     
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