Scientific difference between "Zeolite" and "zeolith"?

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by jacquesb, 16 Nov 2009.

  1. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Hi there "guru's" - can anyone please tell me the official scientific differences between the "cheap" zeolite (that "removes ammonia") and the "expensive" zeolith (that everyone "says" that must be used for a zeovit system) are?

    And please - I don't want marketing answers - as those I already know....

    (Neil - LappiesReef - 459b -> this is mainly directed at you 3 - or perhaps anyone else with either a geology or scientific degree who know the intricaces of these things) :)

    Many thanks for your help with this. :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
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  3. Jaak

    Jaak

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    They're spelled differently...:whistling::lol::lol::lol: Only kidding mate, couldn't resist.
     
  4. jacquesb

    jacquesb Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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  5. Sentari

    Sentari

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    Please include NeoZeo in the conversation also :) A good run down of zeolites would be good also. Main use etc
     
  6. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    they are one and the same, each refers to zeolites,
    the same as egg-plant and brinjals are the same veg

    all about marketing, well from what i have researched on them and the filters
     
  7. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    both refer to zeolitic mediums which house bacteria and remove things due to their ion exchange and affinities

    some marketing
     
  8. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    there are several forms of zeolites, the most famous is cat litter :)
     
  9. jacquesb

    jacquesb Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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    Many thanks for the response and answers, Dallas.

    Any one else who would like to comment on this question, please?
     
  10. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    As far as i am aware, they are different names for the same group of compunds. Both zeolite/zeolith/NeoZeo/etc all do the same thing in terms of adsorbing toxins, but where they differ is they have differnt binding properties. So some will bind more efficiently than others and will also bind different compounds. As dallasg points out, alot of it comes down to marketing.
    ill look into it a bit more and get back to you
     
  11. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Jacques, it is the same thing bud. Here is a little extract worth reading

    Zeolite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  12. jacquesb

    jacquesb Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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    Hello David - many thanks for your input. I really appreciate it.

    I would really appreciate some more technical/scientific proof as well......
     
  13. jacquesb

    jacquesb Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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  14. davidfr7

    davidfr7

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    Jacquesb I would like to open a can of worms. In fresh water i use zeolite in filters to absorb ammonia. After a year I take the filter off the system and put in a mix of salt and water and let it stand in the sun. By doing this the zeolite releases all the ammonia. After a good bake i flush it with clean water. Zeolite is then recharged and good for another year. My point is in Marine water the salinty is so high that the zeolite will not absorb ammonia. The zeolite has one good benifit though it is more porous than LR. In a zeovit system you add chunks of zeolite and remove after awhile and replace with a new chunk?? Wont that be same as throwing a chuck of live rock away and adding a new chunk.

    This is my understanding of zeolite. I'm i wrong in saying this?
     
  15. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    how much salt do you add to?

    sea water only contains around 3% salt, which although tastes very slaty, isnt a very high concentration.

    the zeolite will adsorb the ammonia and being porous has an extrrmely high surface area. These two facters make ideal conditions (ie food and space) for bacterial growth, which will then remove the ammonia and allow for more ammonia to be adsorbed.
     
  16. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Phosphate removal in marine electrolytes by zeolite synthesized from coal fly ash

    Qingyu Guan, Xiaozhen Hu, Deyi Wu, Xiao Shang, Chun Ye and Hainan Kong

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of seawater electrolytes on removal of phosphate by zeolite synthesized from fly ash (ZFA). A low-calcium ZFA was initially saturated with Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Al3+, and Fe3+. Al- and Fe-ZFA showed nearly complete removal of phosphate regardless of the major seawater electrolytes, pH, and salinity. This result was explained primarily on the basis of the adsorption mechanism through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. The remaining ZFAs showed lower phosphate removal performance, in general with the order of Ca-ZFA > Mg-ZFA > Na-ZFA. Compared with pure water, increase of electrolyte concentration or salinity initially enhanced phosphate uptake but then reduced phosphate removal. The individual presence of major seawater electrolytes all facilitated the retention of phosphate, with CaCl2 being the most effective. The mechanism for phosphate removal by Na-, Mg-, and Ca-ZFA was due mostly to precipitation. Repeated batch equilibration experiments indicated that, compared with pure water, ZFA had greater sorptive capacity for phosphate (except for Ca-ZFA, whose capacity decreased slightly) and had lower reversibility for sorbed phosphate in marine electrolytes. In conclusion, our results suggest that presence of seawater electrolytes had roughly no effect, or even positive effects, on the removal of phosphate by ZFA.
     
  17. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Removal of ammonia toxicity in marine sediment TIEs: a comparison of Ulva lactuca, zeolite and aeration methods

    R. M. Burgess , M. C. Pelletier, K. T. Ho, J. R. Serbst, S. A. Ryba, A. Kuhn, M. M. Perron, P. Raczelowski and M. G. Cantwell

    Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) can be used to determine the specific toxicant(s), including ammonia, causing toxicity observed in marine sediments. Two primary TIE manipulations are available for characterizing and identifying ammonia in marine sediments: Ulva lactuca addition and zeolite addition. In this study, we compared the efficacy of these methods to (1) remove NHx and NH3 from overlying and interstitial waters and (2) reduce toxicity to the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and mysid Americamysis bahia using both spiked and environmentally contaminated sediments. The utility of aeration for removing NHx and NH3 during a marine sediment TIE was also evaluated preliminarily. In general, the U. lactuca and zeolite addition methods performed similarly well at removing spiked NHx and NH3 from overlying and interstitial waters compared to an unmanipulated sediment. Toxicity to the amphipod was reduced approximately the same by both methods. However, toxicity to the mysid was most effectively reduced by the U. lactuca addition indicating this method functions best with epibenthic species exposed to ammonia in the water column. Aeration removed NHx and NH3 from seawater when the pH was adjusted to 10; however, very little ammonia was removed at ambient pHs (8.0). This comparison demonstrates both U. lactuca and zeolite addition methods are effective TIE tools for reducing the concentrations and toxicity of ammonia in whole sediment toxicity tests.
     
  18. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Zeolites in marine nitrogen transformations

    J.L. López-Ruiz and MaE. Gómez-Garrudo

    The decomposition of unconsumed food is one of the ammonium sources in aquaculture. In an earlier work we studied the action of zeolites on ammonium elimination and we found an effective reduction of this cation but if zeolite is present in small doses, it seems that it potentiates ammonium formation, and produces possibly a catalytic action to which zeolitic products are disposed, or stimulates the microbial activity.
    In the present work we studied the possible influence of a zeolite on the transformation of ammonium to nitrite in conditions of normal oxygenation and under artificial oxygenation in sea water. We also report on the effect of zeolite on NH4+ appearance produced by fish food decomposition.
     
  19. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Modification on natural clinoptilolite zeolite for its NH4+ retention capacity

    Vinay Kumar Jha and Shigeo Hayashi

    The scope of this study was to modify the natural clinoptilolite zeolite available locally (Akita Prefecture, Japan) for its ammonium ions retention capacity. The natural clinoptilolite was modified chemically and mechanically with changing time duration of sodium hydroxide treatment and ball to powder mass ratio in wet ball milling, respectively. The ammonium ions retention capacity of thus obtained modified clinoptilolites were found to sharply increase with either increasing alkaline metal cations content or increasing specific surface area (decreasing particle size) of the clinoptilolite. The main mechanism of ammonium ions retention is ion exchange and Na+ ions were observed to be more easily exchanged for ammonium ions. The sorption isotherms were good fit to the Langmuir model in the cases of natural and chemically modified clinoptilolites while Freundlich model was favorable in the case of mechanically modified clinoptilolites. The maximum NH4+ retention capacities of natural clinoptilolite (NZeo), clinoptilolite treated with NaOH solution for 72 h (Zeo-72) and wet-milled clinoptilolite (WM-50) according to Langmuir model were 0.89, 1.15 and 1.39 mmol/g, respectively. The overall reaction is pseudo-second-order with rate constant of 3.6 × 10−2 dm3 g/(mmol min). It was possible to enhance the NH4+ retention capacity of natural clinoptilolite just by decreasing particle size without incorporating any further exchangeable cations within the framework of zeolite.
     
  20. jacquesb

    jacquesb Thread Starter Retired Moderator

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    WOW! Many thanks 459b! Now THAT is what I am talking about! One thing that bothers me though - I don't see reference to any "zeolith"?
     
  21. magman

    magman

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    eish, sounds like fancy bio balls.
     
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