regards from Stilbay

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by japie, 13 Nov 2010.

  1. japie

    japie

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    hallo Hennie,

    Ja ons bly op jou spoor hier van Stilbaai se kant, tel me some more about magro Alge. The stuff we find in Stilbay, wy do they die after a couple of days. The eelgras lasts quite a while but all the other stuff just don't last,

    Praat weer later
     
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  3. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    Hi Japie,

    Nice to hear from you again - I trust you folks are well down there in Stilbaai :)

    In my opinion, this could be due to a few factors:

    Light intensity: The macro algae found in rock pools are exposed to full-brightness sunshine, and anything less than metal halide lighting (I would say at least 2 x 150W lamps on a 1.2m tank, or better still 2 x 250W...) would not be bright enough.

    Correct nutrients: Our marine setups are geared towards the keeping of fish and/or coral, and macro algae do not have the exact same requirements. A magnesium or alkalinity level aimed at keeping corals might not necessarily be ideal for keeping macro algae (but don't ask me what levels would be ideal :whistling:) If anything, I would guess that one should try to replicate the levels found in nature.

    Predation: Many of our fish, and other inhabitants such as snails and urchins, are herbivores, and as such they will eat the algae. Unlike as in Nature, our tanks are closed systems, and the algae cannot escape this continuous predation.

    Chemical warfare: Many corals and other marine invertebrates secrete chemicals which inhibit algal growth to protect them from being over-grown by the algae. In nature the vast volume of water would dilute these chemicals once they spread away from the organism which produce them. Unfortunately, with our tanks being very small volumed closed systems, this is not the case in our aquariums, and (I believe...) the macro algae, being more sensitive to these chemicals than e.g. green hair algae, suffer the concequences.

    I did in the past manage to keep beautiful macro algae in a tank which had good lighting, very little predation and only a few soft corals, but ultimately lost all of them to predation from a bunch of urchins which grew up in the tank. These macro algae comprised various species of Sargassums, Ulva (green and red) and "bushy" coralline algae.

    Hennie
     
  4. japie

    japie Thread Starter

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    Thanks Hennie, so it is a combination of problems and looks like it will be more dificult to keep algea than fish and corals. All are well in S bay, Henk is getting old en some times it looks like the "lus for his Aquarium" is not there any more, Marie is still up and about

    Tri to send you some picks. Kry dit nie reg nie BC

    Thanks again .
     
  5. ed

    ed

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    do remember the temperature, can cannot keep cold water specimens in tropical conditions, they will die soon, as well as the other factor mentioned
     
  6. japie

    japie Thread Starter

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    Hennie, I think mostly that is the reason.

    Thanks,

    Japie
     
  7. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    True - thanks for a very valid point :thumbup:

    Whilst staying in Riversdale I did manage to keep some Sargussum species, collected from the rock pools at Jongensfontein (near Stilbaai), in my tropical tank for more than two years, and they grew very well - so in this case they did adapt to the rather large temperature change. I believe that organisms living in rock pools are more adaptable, as these pools do heat up quite a lot during low tide.

    One other point to keep in mind - macro algae should preferably be collected whilst still attached to a rock or shell (or whatever they are growing on...), and should not be damaged during collection. Many algae will "bleed" to death if they are cut or otherwise damaged.

    Hennie
     
    Last edited: 17 Nov 2010
  8. japie

    japie Thread Starter

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    Thanks Hennie,

    Japie
     
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