Regal Tang Quarantine

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by Reef surgeon, 5 Apr 2011.

  1. Reef surgeon

    Reef surgeon

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    It has long been advised in this industry that a quarantine set up for new arrivals to a settled reef system is not at all a bad idea. I am in agreament to this and after my own research I have set up the same for the pupose of ensuring that new arrivals are eating and show no signs of infection. Over a 14 day period one can be satisfied with the out come before release to the reef setup. I have had both success and failure in my endeavours, but mostly success. I have ruled my failures to poor purchase or poor in store tank water handling conditions. I have just added a much desired regal tank of approximately 4 '' to the auarantine setup wich is approximatley 100litre plus with wear filtration and flouresent lighting. Water can be directed by plumbed system from main tank as well as shut of for independant operation and treatment as filter media can be removed.There is no substrate to permit parasite incubation but there is live rock retreats for shy arrivals such as the regal tang. It was noted after a quick check that the SG of the bagged fish was 1015 and as such I lowered the quarantine SG to 1018 as close as possible whilst maintiaing kh of 9.
    This tang has been in for two days and has only briefly displayed himself for the rest of the time the fish remains hidden within the retreat areas of the tank. My research has revealed that at first this speciman can be very shy and wll with time come out from hidding, also that this speciman is very prone to parasite infection - white spot. There is no other individuals in quarantine and A diet if brine shrimp soaked with LIPOVIT and green sea veggies strapped to the live rock is what has been offered but not very well received. Live brine is the next step but I am concerned about the progess after two days and the outcome if the tang does not start to eat. There is no sign of infection and the tang is not showing any imediate signs of thinig. I also wittnessed the fish eat at the time of purchase.

    Can anyone dispense some more advice perhaps there is soemthing I am missing all the help appreciated
     
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  3. Nsteyn

    Nsteyn

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    It seems like you have it covered bud! I am sure he will be fine.

    Ciao
     
  4. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Take a look at the white spot cycle. The Tomonts take 3 to 28 days to hatch.
    [​IMG]



    Loads of extra info on
    Urgent help needed Marine Ich ? What is the correct treatment? - Marine Aquariums of South Africa

    So 14 days, not going to do it. After 3 to 7 days the Trophonts (visible white spot on fish) falls off. And settle on the substrate. Fish is clean or looks clean. You go Hurray.

    Having some live rock retreats, same as substrate. Actually I believe the white spot will be happier to settle close to where the fish hides and sleeps. Easier to re-infect the fish.
     
    Last edited: 5 Apr 2011
  5. danimal

    danimal

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    wow riaan, that's quite a pic :p
     
  6. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Not mine, Hannesco originally posted it.

    I will re-use it forever, so that we all can learned how our common enemy behaviour.

    In my opinion, only thing that work for white spot, is the bucket method. 3 days in first bucket, then 3 days in next bucket. Use two sets of heaters and pumps. Dry out completely in the sun the bucket and equipment not in use. Repeat this process 3 times. That is 9 days. So all the Trophonts should have fallen off by now. Can go for one more to make sure. Then put the fish in a "normal" quarantine tank for 4 weeks. To catch other possible sickness like brook and parasites.

    Using copper, does not work, only effective against free swimming larvae that find a host in 1 or 2 days. If it hatch where the fish sleeps, then its 1 or 2 hours.

    Treating whitspot on the fish, does not work. More harmful to the fish than to the white spot. And anyway the Trophonts dig in under the skin. So they are protected.

    Tomonts are susceptible to low salinity (low survival rate), or to dry out (no survival - yeah). That is all that kills it. But they cement themselves to the rockwork or substrate or bottom pane.

    So if nothing you do to treat the infected fish inside the quarantine tank works. Then only option is to remove the infected environment and put the fish in a new tank.

    But this is not fail proof either. Need to re-acclimatise the fish every third day and that is also stressful. But the white spot is not in the water column itself, it drops down quickly and settles. So I drain 50% water from old bucket to new, ensuring that I do not siphon the bottom. Biggest problem then is to slowly fill the new bucket again to 100%.

    I done that now a month ago with a clown and Coral beauty. And that is where I learned the top up lesson. Lost the coral beauty. Clown is fine.
     
    Last edited: 5 Apr 2011
  7. LifeAquatic

    LifeAquatic

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    I don't think the question is about white spot, I read it to be how do I get this critter to eat? Sorry if I'm wrong here. I had the same issue with a Clown Tang. He hid all the time and got very thin in QT.

    I figured he was a goner but I got some frozen reef plankton... the really small ones. I thawed it and mixed in Spirulina Flakes, Thera+ pellets w/garlic, and crushed in some dried krill (I made it small because he was a smaller fish). Fed the QT multiple times on the days that i was home; really overfed the tank so there would always be food... which meant frequent water changes of course.

    I would walk away from the tank and kind of hide but watch for him and sure enough he eventually would come out and eat. Well, he was in QT for about 6 weeks because it took that long for him to fatten up enough to make it through the DT introduction and harassment by the others who saw him as the intruder. He is now the bully of the tank even though he's still smaller in size than the rest... AND now he eats just about everything I put in there.
     
  8. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Nope, white spot mentioned.

    Yes agreed, food also mentioned.

    Need to point out that 14 days will not prevent white spot entering your display.

    I lost fish in quarantine on day 30. Due to white spot.

    Agree, white spot is not the only sickness. But it is the most common, just check the number of posts made about it.
     
  9. Reef surgeon

    Reef surgeon Thread Starter

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    Quarantine

    Thanks for the input I agree with ur white spot theory and the substrate
    Or live rock retreat being a magnet for the parasite do u suggest that I remove I am afraid that this will increase stress with no refuge formsleep. I was thinking of doing this and than covering the tank with a towel thereby making the whole tank his retreat your thoughts
     
  10. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Use pieces of PVC pipe, especially elbows. See if you can get black ones.
    They hide in there as well
     
  11. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    and make sure tank is covered.
     
  12. Suhayl

    Suhayl

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    If you thinking of adding many more fish to your display get yourself a good quality uv sterilizer.
     
  13. LifeAquatic

    LifeAquatic

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    Yes, I see this comment. It's just the way I read it sounded like he was speaking of Regal Tangs in general rather than this particular fish. Not to say that white spot isn't a concern, it most definitely is and the info you provided is perfect. I was just covering the 'getting them to eat' part b/c, correct me if I'm wrong but, a fish that is well fed and plump has a much better chance of surviving white spot if they DO get it... do you agree? At least that has been my experience.
     
  14. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Not for me.
    I had 2 Pacific Double saddle butterfly fish in quarantine during December. Both ate, and were not shy at all. Getting along nicely. Said to myself, on New Years day they are moving to display. Lost first one on last day of the year, the other the first day of the next year. Wow - happy new year :(

    Problem is that white spot in the sea have a very low re-infection rate. So they hatch in big numbers to ensure a change that at least some might find a host. In display tank, that is an enclosed area, their changes of finding a host a better. In a quarantine tank, that is a lot smaller, they can find a host a lot easier. So a lot do survive, and that is why in my opinion the second round is so bad. On the third, the fish will be dead if it did not get immune (most likely not with my luck).

    So, in my experience, even when the fish was happy, eating, coming out towards me and generally looked 100%. When that white spot eggs hatch, they get so infected that it just does not help.

    Again, that is why I rather take the white spot eggs away, out of the surroundings. I do not want that second round to hatch.
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2011
  15. LifeAquatic

    LifeAquatic

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    Yeah, I see where you're coming from and I totally agree that you need to get them out of the system. I had an issue years ago with my small tank. I had an outbreak too and all my fish were healthy and well fed but still most succumbed to the disease. I think the only survivor was a little green spotted puffer! I let the tank go fallow for probably 6 months before any other fish were introduced... only had coral and inverts.
     
  16. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    An interesting article on parasites. Note the statement on MI temperature.
     

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  17. AfricaOffroad

    AfricaOffroad

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    Nice, you work in this field of science and for your hard work , you get a parasite named after you
    :biggrin:
     
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