Preservatives in fish/shrimps

Discussion in 'Anemone's' started by JacoD01, 14 May 2014.

  1. JacoD01

    JacoD01

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    Good morning every body.

    I have a magnificent anemone which I have on a hake only diet at the moment.

    I have managed to obtain shrimps which I intend expand his diet with, but I noted that they have used 3% citric acid and sodium citrate (which refers to any of the sodium salts of citric acid)

    Now I know that citric acid is lethal to any of our reef dwelling friends in large quantities.

    Any views on this?

    May 2014.jpg

    Packaged instructions.jpg
     
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  3. Zandy

    Zandy

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    Hi there, also note that they make use of colourants on prawns too, in order to maintain the colour. By the looks of the photo above your anemone seems very healthy and if feeding it hake works, i would rather just stick to that. From the prawns you very unlikely to get better nutitional value. I would rather play it safe and purchase frozen foods specifically designed for feeding our little tankmates. Why try something else if what you are doing is working....there is also a chance that the anemone won't even eat the prawns. My suggestion.....make a prawn potjie and invite MASA members !!! lol BTW Nice looking tank !!;)
     
  4. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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  5. puffer fish

    puffer fish

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    i sell seafood for a living fresh and frozen and i can tell you i have fed my fish just about any thing you can imagine , scallops,clams,tuna,pencil bait,crab,red bait,roe ...if i eat it my tank eats it , oh and about the crabsticks.......i dont eat crabsticks or butter fish and neither should you
     
  6. 459b

    459b Moderator

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    Any particular reason for this?

    Is there any truth in the story that some of the dodgier fishmongers use meat tenderizer to make their squid softer?
     
  7. puffer fish

    puffer fish

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    yes alot of top franchises used acidic products like lemon use , rice vinegar even milk , but if you buying rings some times depending or origin you have no choice , steaks or steaks that are cut into strips are a much better bet , the Patagonia stuff is always good and needs only a light coating of flour some hot oil and a dollop of wasabi mayo .....yummy

    butter fish is well used in most popular restaurants its actually pretty bad specially for women (not going to go in too detail)

    The problem is that sometimes you may have no idea what you’re eating and that it could make you feel quite ill.

    Escolar is a perfect example. Have you ever seen it on a restaurant menu?

    Likely not.

    But it does lurk on many eateries list of options, particularly Japanese ones. You’ll often see it listed as butterfish or white tuna – butterfish due to its high fat content and smooth texture and white tuna due to its colour. It is not, though, related in any way to white albacore tuna.

    This white firm fleshed fish is often described as being quite delicious but it can leave you with less than pleasing consequences not long after you eat it.

    Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps and/ or headache - all of which can be pretty dramatic - can occur within a few hours of eating the fish and can last up to 24 to 48 hours. For healthy people, it’s simply an inconvenience but for those with underlying health problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome, it can be more serious.

    How sick you may get depends on individual tolerances. And it’s all due to an indigestible oily substance called wax esters. This oily substance, named gempylotoxin after the family of fish, Gempylidae, escolar belongs to, is indigestible as it passes through the digestive tract. The consequences of eating the fish have nothing to do with freshness. It’s simply the fish itself.



    DNA tested. Five of nine restaurants serving fish labeled “white tuna,” “white tuna (albacore)” or “super white tuna” were actually serving escolar.[7] From 2010 to 2013, a study by Oceana, an Ocean preservation

    there some more descriptive info available but its not cool and you dont want to know .

    Crabsticks.....well fake will always be fake ....sugar ends up as carbs and you dont want that in your tank unless dosing VSV



    '
     
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  8. sharktail

    sharktail

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    buy pilchards(bait) 1kg boxes no preservatives fresh from the boat into the box and frozen, i was working at afactory that process it.
     
  9. 459b

    459b Moderator

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    Thanks for that puffer fish
    Good to know about the escalor, now I'll have to break tradition and stop always blaming the shellfish!
     
  10. carlosdeandrade

    carlosdeandrade

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    Wow. Good info. I always order butter fish when I eat at my local fish monger.
     
  11. OP
    JacoD01

    JacoD01

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    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015

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