Phosphate remover questions

christiaan

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Hi Guys and gals

Please help.

I need some phosphate remover for my 120 litre nano.

My LFS has two choices. . .

1. Chemipure Elite in a bag @ R190 - says it lasts 3 months and enough for up to 40 gal (I have 30 gallon tank)

2. Aqua medic Iron based black phosphate remover @ R20 but its enough to treat 1000 gallons for 6 months! But it almost looks like stuff that needs to be added to a reactor, will it work in a bag with lotsa flow over it.

3 Have used seachems phosguard before and it's awesome but can't seem to find anywhere??

Anything else I should look like - I dont run a skimmer so I can't use the liquid chemical stuff

Thanks
 

lappiesreef

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Hey Christiaan

Where do you get the black phos remover for R20? Or is that R200?
If R20 please PM me details :)

It should work woth goof flow over it...
Other thing you can try is Purigen... Really good stuff. There is a thread or two on here about it..
 

lappiesreef

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:( Would have been a bargain ;)
If you ahve purigen why do you want another checmial scrubber?
 

lanzo

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i don't like seachem phosguard, it doesn't seem to work as long as the AM phos media
 

Warr7207

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I like the seachem product, cause it can take loads of movement through it, where other brands disintegrate if the particles tumble around
 

SIMS

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that's also true...I have mine running in a phosban reactor with an OR2500
 

viper357

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Here is some food for thought about Seachem Phosguard, the conclusion gives you the short and sweet version of the story.

However, I don't know how relevant this study is today as this study was done some 5 years ago.

Server error!
 

Warr7207

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Here is some food for thought about Seachem Phosguard, the conclusion gives you the short and sweet version of the story.

However, I don't know how relevant this study is today as this study was done some 5 years ago.

Server error!
Seachem's response:

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q: I've contacted Reef forums and I was told that your product releases aluminum, which will close corals for weeks and might even damage them! How can something like that not be stated on the package? Furthermore, the product description states: "PhosGuard is not an exchange resin, it will not release anything to the water". This to me is a bit of false advertising and puts reef tanks worth thousands of $ at a huge risk
A: We do recommend rinsing/immersing the product in a double volume of freshwater which should remove most of the fine dust particles that can cause temporary irritation to some soft species. With regards to the release of aluminum, we are aware that it has been shown that under certain conditions aluminum is able to affect some soft species. However this is in no way conclusive as there are a number of other situations where a product such as PhosGuard has had no such negative affect at all. Based on the evidence it would appear it is more than a simple "aluminum from phosphate removers is the sole culprit". We are looking into the matter more closely so that we can provide a meaningful cautionary statement (i.e. "use of this product under _this set of conditions xxxxxxx_ can have a deleterious affect and should be avoided).

With regards to the false advertising claim I can assure you that was certainly never the intention. The statement "it will not release anything in to the water" is made in reference to it not being an exchange resin to further underscore the difference between it and an exchange resin: by their nature exchange resins release an equivalent amount of material for every piece of material they absorb. PhosGuard does not release anything into the water upon phosphate or silicate removal... in other words the extremely low level of aluminum leached is not correlated with its phosphate or silicate removal activity. Furthermore, the amount of aluminum that is released is in the microgram range. In other words, an extremely low level that from a chemical standpoint would be characterized as "non-soluble" i.e. non-soluble material is not released into the solvent (i.e. water). Any search on the solubility characteristics of aluminum oxide would show it to be considered completely insoluble in water.

The bottom line is that if the directions are followed and the product is well rinsed in freshwater, any deleterious effects should be minimal to non-existant and temporary.

Source: PhosGuard FAQ


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George

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Phosphate remover

Antiphos or rowaphos is the way to go.
Well there is another alternative for short term phosphate removal and long term removal.
Tunze make both, short term Al ( quick acting) based and a long term Fe based remover. Both are chips and have a high bonding capacity for removal of silicates and Phosphate. They come in 750 ml containers and can be utilsed in reactors , or near outlets where the flow is quite strong.
For those guys who have nano tanks there is also Nano chem 300ml bottle which removes Phosphates colouring matter organic compounds and also prevents the development for nitrates and phosphates also stabalises pH value. used in a nylon bag.

George
Tunze S.A.
 

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