Nudibranches

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Howzit Guys,

Anybody got a good link to where I can ID some nudibranches.

Last night, about 2am, I decided to check in on my tank. When I turned the lights on, apart from hundreds of bristle worms cruising the substrate, I saw a number of what looks like nudibranches cruising the rocks.

I cannot get photos as they are brilliantly designed to blend in with the rock. They are flat, grey coloured with grey bristles on their backs.

I need to try and find out if they are reef safe or not.

Cheers
 

dallasg

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try and get pics, or use a tweezer to move them and take pics...

look at Aquarium Life
 
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I found this one site, but its way to complex for me. I thought other guys who know more will appreciate it.

http://www.seaslugforum.net/
Thanks Kevin,

Yeah that site is a bit difficult to navigate unless you happen to know the species you are looking for.

Good info though :thumbup:
 
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Shotgun question.

Without a picture so therefore no identification, are flatworms generally harmful to corals?
 
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Sounds like a chiton to me. Google the word and see if it turns up.
 
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Shotgun question.

Without a picture so therefore no identification, are flatworms generally harmful to corals?
Well yes , but then at the same time a resounding No.
You see it very much depends on which species you are dealing with and hence identification is important.

There are a large group of flatworms that are fairly benign to both corals and other lifeforms, but the great difficulty one has in making a positive identification sometimes makes it impossible to predict exactly what the effect on a reef tank will be.

I have found 2 Nudi's and decided to dump them . Couldn't ID the critters and rather went the safe route of removing them.

Sorry Kevin , I know this doesn't really help your cause , but IMO I would do the following:

1. Try to ID the critter as close as possible
2. Failing a positive ID , I would recommend removing them

Just my thoughts;)
 
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Well yes , but then at the same time a resounding No.
You see it very much depends on which species you are dealing with and hence identification is important.

There are a large group of flatworms that are fairly benign to both corals and other lifeforms, but the great difficulty one has in making a positive identification sometimes makes it impossible to predict exactly what the effect on a reef tank will be.

I have found 2 Nudi's and decided to dump them . Couldn't ID the critters and rather went the safe route of removing them.

Sorry Kevin , I know this doesn't really help your cause , but IMO I would do the following:

1. Try to ID the critter as close as possible
2. Failing a positive ID , I would recommend removing them

Just my thoughts;)

Thanks, only problem is that these buggers are nocturnal, extremely difficult to see, and I am not really in to stripping out all my live rock at 02:00 in the morning to get them out. So far, my polyps, mushrooms and leather coral show no signs that anything has been chowing them. A few sites mention that if these guys get disturbed they can release a toxin that can wipe out the fish (depending on which species of nudi, flatworm etc they are). I will have to adopt a 'wait and see approach'. If I can get one out easily then I will, but at the moment they all seem to be cruising arround the live rock right at the bottom of the heap.

A few sites mention that they are very difficult to breed in an aquarium, so hopefully they will just run their course without chowing any corals.
 
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Kevin,

That's fine. I wouldn't go overboard here.
Firstly , if they are Nudi's or flatworms and if you happen to see them - then pick them out. ( But not with your hands)
Otherwise just leave them be for now. It took me a week to remove one of the Nudi'd I had.

If on the other hand they are Chitons , leave them be. They are reef safe and are herbivores feeding mainly on algae.
 
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When last did you introduce any thing new to your tank, LR or coral, if it has been a couple of months then you should have noticed them eating your corals by now.

The monti eating nudies seem to reproduce very easily.
My tank is still very new, only about seven weeks old. I got in a leather coral about two weeks ago and it is doing very well, no sign of any eating going on.
 
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Sounds like Stomatella to me. They are good

I have a few of those in the tank, but the things I saw where about 2cm long and about 1cm wide and very flat. No shell, With lots of grey protrusions on their backs.

I saw only one last night. Ugly looking bugger :)
 

dallasg

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i think i have one too, was living in a hole in my LR, looked like a large bristleworm
 
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Bristle worms, I have hundreds! I think I will turn my tank into a species tank and grow bristle worms!
 
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Just don't touch them. Not a pleasant experience. There are a few diy traps you can build to catch them.
 

dallasg

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my worm was about 5cm, white legs, grey body, and both ends tapered into a point
 
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about 2cm long and about 1cm wide and very flat. No shell, With lots of grey protrusions on their backs.

I saw only one last night. Ugly looking bugger :)
Mmmm sorry cannot help then. A picture would though:)
 

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