Mistake?

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by deadmeat2016, 4 Nov 2012.

  1. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Wouter

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    Hi all, I am extremely worried as I recently bought a Clam and going back to the shop asked the owner if bristle worms are bad for clams and he said yes they are lethal.
    Is this true, I have a load of small 1cm long red bristle worms in my tank, I have seen them on the clams shell, does this mean I should kiss the clam goodbye? :(:(:(:(
     
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  3. tekkengal

    tekkengal Moderator

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    Bristle worms are detritivours, they eat things that are dying or decaying. If your clam is dying then they would be around it but for now, if the clam is healthy I wouldn't worry about them :)
     
  4. crispin

    crispin

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    agreed,notmally bristle worms will only go for things that are on the way out. Large bristle worms can be predatory but the smaller ones normally not.

    how long have you had the clam? did it acclimatise well?
     
  5. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    I have only had the clam a couple of days but he acclimated beautifully and is openning fully, jus scared of all the potential predators of my new clam
     
  6. crispin

    crispin

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    give it time wouter, i think you will be fine:) how about a pic? is the clam responsive to changes in light, if you open the lid or wave your hand and create a shadow, does it retract?
     
  7. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    He responds beautifully so hes very healthy, but so he should be fine I take it?

    DSCF0436.JPG

    clam.jpg
     
  8. tekkengal

    tekkengal Moderator

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    Yep, he is fine. beautiful clam btw :)
     
  9. pkc

    pkc

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    Clams can quite often come under attack from the base,I use small sections of freshwater muscles for them to stick to so nothing can get to the base of them.

    You could use a section of thin semi flat coral,non toxic non floating plastic,creramic,a piece of fibreglass anything so it can attach to and not fall to an attack from beneath later on.

    Also they are 90 percent dependant of being close to the light due to immense photosynthetic feeding via the algae in its mantle, this allows them to actually enjoy some levels of nitrate and phosphorus with such a tough mix of algae forms in the mantle tissue.

    Low light or old lighting beyond its quality time,temps above 26c and predators are what normally takes clams.
     
  10. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    Thank you guys and pkc, so you would suggest temps below 26 degrees? my tank is at 26.5, this ok?
     
  11. Submariner

    Submariner

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    Hi Deadmeat2016

    I have to disagree with the other members here.

    Bristle worms are a well known predetor of clams.

    The good news is they only normally enter the clam throught the sand from below, you can make this almost impossible for them by making a base for them to sit on i normally use putty to do this and i literally press the base of the clam against the putty when it is soft to generate a base plug .


    Read the below article if you are thinking of keeping clams






    Feature Article: A Look at "Mysterious Clam Deaths" Advanced Aquarist | Aquarist Magazine and Blog
     
    Last edited: 5 Nov 2012
  12. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    Thankyou submariner, appreciate the opinion. I have moved the clam onto the rockwork and hopefully it will attach but im not happy with the location, will see how it goes.
    The article was an interesting read but doesnt give enough information on how to reduce the risks, it also makes one feel bad about keeping a clam in a captive system. I hope my lighting is adequate
     
  13. carlosdeandrade

    carlosdeandrade

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    I highly doubt the bristleworms the article is talking about will be found in this tank. Also from what I cansee, this clam is a substrate clam, and even though you will find them on rocks they prefer sandy beds with a rocky a under bed, so as to extend their strong byssus filaments. You could use some of the ideas that @pkc suggested, but as long as they have some sand as well.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  14. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    he hasnt moved again

    DSCF0437.JPG

    DSCF0438.JPG
     
  15. Submariner

    Submariner

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    I would suggest moulding the clam a baseplug with putty and placing him back on the sand bed.
     
  16. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    I will do this because i have the putty but i dont wanna bother the clam anymore for now, hes only a couple days in the tank and ive moved him 2 or 3 times, gnna let him do what he wants for a bit
     
  17. crispin

    crispin

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    Just for claritry so that people dont start stressing about having bristle worms and clams together ive hightlighted some advice already given. I am still pretty certain of what i say.

    thats an intresteing article you posted, and from a very good auther, but just to quote from that article...

    There are also a number of errant polychaetes, commonly known as bristle worms, which have the potential to kill a clam. A few can get ridiculously large, with a handful of species reaching lengths of one or more meters, and some are indeed carnivorous. However, these relatively large and potentially dangerous species are actually very, very uncommon in aquariums, and they represent only a tiny percent of the hundreds of species of bristle worms that can be found in the seas. To the contrary, the overwhelming majority of species are quite harmless, and are actually beneficial in aquariums, as many are scavengers and/or detritus eaters.

    Still, I personally have never seen any evidence whatsoever of a bristle worm attacking a healthy clam in any way. Yet what I have seen is scavenging worms coming out and feeding on the tissues of a very unhealthy or dead clam. So, if you happen to lose a tridacnid and then discover that there are some bristle worms crawling around inside it, don't assume that the worms were the cause of death. In other words, there's a chance that a mysterious clam death may be brought about by a hungry bristle worm, but it's a slim chance.


    there are things that can attack clams and as PKC says they will most often enter from the base. But these are rarely small bristle worms.

    So I am pretty sure that Wouters clam will be fine in a reef tank that has some bristle worms in it.
     
  18. deadmeat2016

    deadmeat2016 Thread Starter Wouter

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    Thanks so much guys, I appreciate all the help :thumbup:
     
  19. pkc

    pkc

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    I didn't want to be too negative to some one that may be a little green to the hobby,but this comment from Submariner,i agree totaly with!!
    Never trust a worm other then tube worms,never trust a crab beyond acro or anemone crabs,never trust any hermit crabs beynod tiny yellow claws that will not have shells to up size with and never trust any type of nudibranch and be carefull with sea stars and the lumpy spiral shelled snail,some of both are predators to clams.

    There are many other things to not trust for the hobby in many ways,its just not worth the risk.
    There are many others i have learnt over the last 30 plus years at this and are to many to go into.

    The temps i have found best over the years are no less then 23c and no higher then 25c.
     
    Last edited: 7 Nov 2012
  20. carlosdeandrade

    carlosdeandrade

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    That's given a new meaning to the word generalisation, and know I am scared too.:whistling:;)
     
  21. pkc

    pkc

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    It’s about sharing what is learnt and what has been learnt of something safer for another’s hobby experience, that shouldn’t have to make the same mistakes as others have with in their hobby, it’s called sharing!

    I have learnt the hard, why should others that I type to go down the same road, or maybe have a section here on all the exact species names and descriptions of all these creatures I mentioned and more that may be a problem with in each type of creatures ways and equally the ones that are not a problem.

    Then you need to explain the possibility that each creature, good or bad may not act in the way they do on average, which happens a great deal.

    Now the need to generalise comes in to play or the hobbyist takes the same risks not knowing they were taking a risk as I have done and fails here and there and suffers as I did.

    That hobbyist just got a piece of my extensive failures to look at and hopefully not have them as well.
     
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