Lighting

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by mornewil, 12 Jul 2011.

  1. mornewil

    mornewil Morne

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    Guys please some advice....

    Just spoke to a lighting supplier re a magic fluorescent high bay which i thought would be perfect but just wanna know if it would work.

    The fitting is 1490x520x85
    4x 80w T5's on individual reflectors with a clear acrylic cover.

    My tank dimensions 1500L 800H 700W

    What bugs me though is that its a metal fitting.
    And when i think metal & salt i think rust...

    Please help guys
     
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  3. mariusmeyer

    mariusmeyer

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    All units that I have seen is metal. It just depends on the coating. If it is say powder coated or completely painted with a good metal paint like hammerite then I dont see any issues.
     
  4. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    ok cool it should be good then. So will the 4 80W T5's be enough?
     
  5. Keanan

    Keanan 2time

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    4 T5's wont be enough on a tank that wide and especially that high. My tank is 1.2 x 50w x 70h and 4 54w T5's was not enough and now have 8 on it.

    It also depends on what you want to keep, but i think MH is your best bet on a tank that high.
     
    Last edited: 12 Jul 2011
  6. SchyffS

    SchyffS Reef Aquarist

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    Post Pics, it will help with giving guidance on the specific light unit(and for others to understand) :)

    What is your water volume height in this tank of yours? If its 600-650mm then it will be okay. This water height has been established by more experienced reefers and researchers, the key is that sufficient PAR readings are achieved at the lower levels of the tank. PAR diminishes through water depth via pollution, dillution, absorbtion refraction and light spectrum filtering....u get the idea. The PAR readings relates to light intensity and spectrum that is required for coral health.....just some background to why all teh fuss on specifc light sources etc etc.

    For FOWLR: 4 T5's should be fine, it will also be okay for some types of corals but the less light hungry ones.
    For Mixed Reef or more light hungry corals: 8 - 10 T5's will be required.
    Depening on your pocket.....you can purchase additional as required.
     
    Last edited: 12 Jul 2011
  7. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    Good advise so far - I agree that a metal hood won't cause much problems if maintained in good condition (painted regularly, etc.)

    As previously stated, the 4 x 80W might be a tad weak for the more light loving corals (and anemones and clams...), especially for those lower down in the tank. If the depth is 850mm (not sure, as you show 85, and there is no indication if this is width or depth...) then you will need some SERIOUS metal halide lighting.

    One other thing that could cause some problems long term, is the clear acrylic cover to the lights. This cover can become dirty (with salt spray, etc) pretty quickly if relatively close to the water surface. Also, the acrylic can darken over time, and either condition will cut down on the amount of light that reaches your corals and other livestock. I would suggest that you closely monitor the cover over time, and perhaps consider removing it if it becomes dull.

    Hennie
     
  8. Keanan

    Keanan 2time

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    Hi Hennie

    He did state that his tank is 1500l x 700w x 800h

    Thats what I was thinking, at a depth of 800mm MH is the way to go.
     
  9. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    thanx for the comments.

    I have about 15 28W T5 fittings which a guy told me wont work. He said i should rather go for 54 or better 80w fittings.

    I actually had the idea of making a hood & installing 9 of that fittings into the hood but
    then i saw this 4x 80w T5 fitting in a lighting catalogue and the dimensions of the fitting is perfect.

    I actually dont wanna start off too hectic. Fish only with live rock and a few corals until i learn a bit more and become more experienced. Im very new to marines.

    And for pics the tank is actually still empty im just busy getting all that i need so i can start setting up
     
  10. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    Lots of work to be done

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Falcon

    Falcon

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    That tank appears to be quite deep,I would suggest atleast 2 of those units if you want to keep fish and softies/easy to keep corals....maybe an sps or two RIGHT near the top of the tank within 30cm of the light....

    For anything more serious you would have to go for minimum 2 x 250wmh plus 2 80w t5 or 400w mh atleast two of them.
     
  12. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    Ok say i wanna start off with fish and live rock only....would 9x 28W T5's be enough.

    I thought since im new to this i can get the MH lights & chiller in future once im a bit more experienced....
     
  13. rakabos

    rakabos

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    Strictly speaking if you are only doing fish, you dont need a single light, its purely there to light up the tank and keep the fish on a day/night cycle so they can sleep at night. As soon as you add corals you need to worry about light. On a fish only tank you can run energy saver bulbs - the fish couldnt care less
     
    Last edited: 13 Jul 2011
  14. rakabos

    rakabos

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    The other thing is, where is the water level. If the tank is 800H then the water level is likely around 700H or so. I run 6x80w T5 on my system of similar dimensions and have amazing growth with softies. Wouldnt be great if I kept hard corals (sps) though
     
  15. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    Cool. I dont wanna spend money on a lighting unit if it wont handle the full reef so
    i'll rather build a unit for now & invest in proper lighting in future.
     
  16. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    So i got my lighting story covered.

    Next is my sump. Been reading alot about the DBS in sumps & yesterday i spoke to someone
    at Sams Aquarium & the guy told me that i should put sand in the sump He said thats old school & a mess to clean. Shed some light on this please?
     
  17. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    Should not put sand in sorry
     
  18. rakabos

    rakabos

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    DSB (deep sand bed) lol.

    Well it helps with nutrient export via bacteria but takes upto 6 months to mature and start working, there are a million threads on it just search. Its an old school method some people swear by and others dont use at all, because they employ other methods
     
  19. rakabos

    rakabos

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    How is it a mess to clean, ure not supposed to touch it ever
     
  20. mornewil

    mornewil Thread Starter Morne

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    Lol that just wat i was told. what would you suggest is the best option for the sump?
     
  21. danimal

    danimal

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    first let me say that you are NOT supposed to try and clean a DSB - at most you might stir up the top layer a bit every now and then to lift settled detritus, but TBH it's not really necessary. especially if you stick a hermit or something in there.

    now, there are tons of opinions on DSBs, google really is your best bet here. this forum also has plenty of threads discussing the subject. but I'll give you a basic rundown here.

    a DSB serves several functions: mainly nutrient export and amphipod breeding. I won't go into the details of the nitrogen cycle, but essentially your waste is processed by the bacteria colonies that set up in the sand. this is one of nature's ways of doing this, excpet that the ocean is not a closed system and has a lot more sand and bacteria to process its krap. we only have a few hundred litres... LOL.

    the other thing is that all sorts of goggas live in that sand... which brings biodiversity to your system which is a good thing. you can also grow macro algae such as chaeto above the DSB, running on a reverse light to the main display. this helps with nutrient export.

    now sometimes DSBs can become ineffective - not enough flow, too deep, too shallow, etc. generally bigger is better (more surfface area) but not necessarily deeper. a lot of reefers start out with a DSB because it basically looks after itself once it is set up and mature-ish. it is not necesarily the most effective means of filtration, and so some people move on the other forms such as NP pellet, Zeolites etc. but those are not simple regimes and generally are not recomennded for beginner reefers.

    so to answer your question: yes your sump will be messy but that is why it sits in the cabinet where no-one can see it :p a clean sump is probably not doing much biologically. you NEED all those little ceratures running around making things look miff.

    hope this helps :)
     
    Last edited: 13 Jul 2011
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