LED info pls

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by roderigo, 17 Jul 2012.

  1. roderigo

    roderigo

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    hi guys i just bought a Ritteri Anemone and my current light is not going to cut it ,instead of installing my 150 MH i would like to put say 4 leds on the nennie only

    or option 2 is fit all 4 T5 with white lamps and supplement with a few blue leds .
    So what you guys think ,any links or sites for leds as i would like to DIY and is there any shops in CT that i can go see for the parts that ill need

    here is a pic of the littel guy
    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Wes

    Wes

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    depth dependant? it shouldn't be a problem to light him up, remember to feed him as well, they are not solely reliant on photosynthasis.

    spelling sux...sorry
     
  4. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    Depth is 45cm
     
  5. DubKorps

    DubKorps

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    they actually are , feeding is supplemental or i would say in captivity they are 90% photosynthetic and 10 feeding once a week or bi-weekly....:lol: forgot everything changes in captivity
     
    Last edited: 18 Jul 2012
  6. Max98

    Max98

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    Have a look at the par led bulbs. Fly has some on his tank.
     
  7. Submariner

    Submariner

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    Dependent on tank size you could use a Solarmax 36 watt LED unit these are good for 450 deep,

    Light spread is 300mm x 400mm.
     
  8. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    CREE XP-G R5 5W Cool White LED with 40°

    or

    Philips Rebel Cyan 3W LED think of using 4 of this

    with 4.25" x 4" Aluminum Heat Sink

    Mean Well LPC-35-700 constant current driver

    any tips will this give me what im looking for ?
     
  9. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

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    the equivilent of a 150w mh is between 12-18 led's 4 led's will not do much the light is going to be concentrated directly under each led.

    What are you looking for?
    A spot light over your neni?
    What if the neni moves?
    I would redo the lighting for your tank if possible.
    either add more t5's or the mh or led's
    For led's
    28 x 3w cree's unlensed and 2 drivers, should give you enough light to keep most things

    Personally i would deck entire tank in led's :thumbup:
     
  10. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    Lol great point , I would like a spot light for the nenie
    Just to sort him out for now and if he moves I move the light coz my plane is to uopgraid the light in the hood soon just want my nenie to be sorter then I don't have to rush the build so yes I sopt light for now thanx for the info
     
  11. Wes

    Wes

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    really?

    Anemones' have nematocysts for a reason: to capture prey
    Anemones' have tentacles for a reason: to capture prey
    Anemones' morphology are taylored as such for a reason: to capture prey

    First, although the anemones that host clownfishes typically harbor photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae, zoochlorellae, etc.), and algal production in intense light appears to be the major source of energy for anemones, all anemones require some animal prey for long-term survival. The shape and behavior of tropical host anemones both serve to increase the amount of area available for "harvesting" sunlight, and with few exceptions, intense lighting (typical of coral reef tanks) is required for anemones gain sufficient energy for survival. Some species are found exclusively in very shallow water and only in areas that are directly exposed tp sunlight (e.g., Stichodactyla gigantea), while others can sometimes be found in shaded areas, or even deep water environments (e.g., Entacmaea quadricolor). Depending on the habitat from which the animals were collected, very different levels of lighting may be required to maintain them successfully. Even in tanks with intense metal halide lighting in which stony corals are thriving, anemones are often reported to bleach and wither -- whether this is a result of too much light for a low-light adapted animal or a sign of other stressors is unknown. Furthermore, despite the fact that anemones look to be helpless predators just waiting for something to blunder into their waiting tentacles, most species appear to be prey specialists, and require both specific mechanical and chemical cues for the discharge of their cnidae (specialized stinging cells that anemones use to capture their prey). The cues required and the venom that is associated with these stinging cells both differ by species, and -- just to make things more complicated -- also differ depending on the condition and hunger of the animal tested. To date, there has been no cnidarian (the group to which anemones and corals belong) discovered which is capable of obtaining 100% of their nutritional requirements from light alone. All cnidarians (the group which includes hard and soft corals, anemones, gorgonians, mushrooms, jellyfish, hydroids and the like) require food to survive, and if the animal has specific feeding or prey requirements, it makes the job of maintaining them in an aquarium that much more difficult. Anemones seem to fall into that category, and there are foods that are readily accepted by one species that are basically ignored and dropped by others. To make this problem more difficult, different aquarists report that their anemones eat different foods this could mean that the animals have been misidentified and are not actually the same anemone species, or (more likely) that prey preference and feeding requirements differ depending on the animal in question and the conditions under which it is kept.
     
  12. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    So will 4 leds with 40 degree lends do the job ?
     
  13. Wes

    Wes

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    I'd say yes, hopefully he likes the spot where he is currently situated :)
     
  14. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    cool thanx problem is the lps had him under the same light if not less and he looked happy for more than a month how can this be and in this case i cant just blast hime with led must take it slow
     
  15. Wes

    Wes

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    yip raise the height of the LED unit, not sure why you're overly concerned if he looks happy?

    Leave him be for a while, feed him, see how things go...
     
  16. roderigo

    roderigo Thread Starter

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    iv only had him 3 days now with no issues and he is already eating but i read all over the net that he needs hell of alot of light thus the worry
     
  17. Wes

    Wes

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    i see, well, if you're worried try the LED light, if you find it doesn't work for the the invert, either try lower the invert and it's rock of have the light lifted or moved it to cover maybe half of the nennie then progressively move it till he's in full light.
     
    Last edited: 18 Jul 2012
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