How to QT an Anemone?

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Hi All,

I just came into ownership of a nice nennie from a LFS... How do you guys normally QT your nennies?
Any advice will be appreciated!

Thanks!
 

hotdog83

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Two weeks in a tank without any fish to make sure most latent fish diseases that might be on the nenny dies out.
 
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Sweet, Thanks!

If the tank had fish but they were removed, would the two weeks start from then? Or does it need to stay for longer?
 

hotdog83

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If you want to eliminate white spot, it will have to be 3 months, but for other diseases like velvet and brooklynella, 2 weeks is normally enough for them to die out due to no fish present. In the end you need to chase fish immunity, as opposed to a completely disease free tank, it is impossible to eliminate each and every disease from your tank, so irrespective of how long you qt, something will kill your fish if water quality is not good and they are stressed.
 

RiaanP

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If nennie is on a rock, yes, WS can sit on the rock

WS form that cyst normaly within the substrate, but any hard surface would do. Including heaters and pumps.
 

RiaanP

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  • Tomont: The “encysted stage” which sticks to rocks, shells, substrate - and even possibly corals/inverts. Tomonts produce “daughter” tomites, which are then released into the water column as theronts.
from
https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/ich-cryptocaryon-irritans.191226/

Will not sit on soft tissue of an anemone. Can be on corals like frogspawns, but on the hard structure, not on the soft flesh.
 

hotdog83

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To be honest, I disagree with @RiaanP, it can stick to any surface, there is even a theory that it can survive inside a fish's gut through multiple treatments, and a possible reason why it appears again even after a fallow period and quarantine. But anyway, the goal in the end should not be to eradicate white spot, as it is impractical for most hobbyists to QT corals and anemones for 3 months plus.
 

RiaanP

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Ok, I have not redone my whitespot research the last 3 or 4 years. From when I did my read ups, the WS after dropping off, will crawl around on substrate looking for a place to turn into a solid hard casing.

For me, once the WS encysts, and if on the soft tissue of an anemone, the normal movement, shrinking at night, inflating daytime of the anemone should dislodge it and the cysts would drop to the substrate. I got no proof, just my logical thinking trying to work it out. Other corals with hard skeleton would be able to carry the hosts on the hard portions.

Anyway, after 2 weeks with temperature of around 25 Celcius, the cysts would have hatched by now looking for a host fish that is not there.

I do agree that overly extended QT periods is not good either.
 

hotdog83

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Ok, I have not redone my whitespot research the last 3 or 4 years. From when I did my read ups, the WS after dropping off, will crawl around on substrate looking for a place to turn into a solid hard casing.

For me, once the WS encysts, and if on the soft tissue of an anemone, the normal movement, shrinking at night, inflating daytime of the anemone should dislodge it and the cysts would drop to the substrate. I got no proof, just my logical thinking trying to work it out. Other corals with hard skeleton would be able to carry the hosts on the hard portions.

Anyway, after 2 weeks with temperature of around 25 Celcius, the cysts would have hatched by now looking for a host fish that is not there.

I do agree that overly extended QT periods is not good either.
I agree the chances are slim that they are carried into the tank on soft tissue, but chances are not 0%. Also agree, 2 weeks normally enough for the majority of ws to complete life cycle, from what I've seen in my tank, it is around 10 days between outbreaks.
 
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I would not place an anemone in quarantine.

The majority of tanks would not have sufficient light and flow for this.

And why stress a sensitive animal out even more ?

Pop him straight in the tank (after acclimatizing - very sensitive to changes in salinity.)
 

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