How to mx saltand ro?

Discussion in 'Beginner Discussions' started by Ivyalt, 21 May 2012.

  1. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt

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    Hi.

    I bought a ro unit and I want to start mixing my own salt.

    Any indications as to how much salt I need to add to get close to 1.026?

    Benchmark?

    A cup per 25 liter or?

    I do not wantto start with a cup and then end up hours later adding 4 cups!

    I would appreciate any indication as to how much to mix (gram per liter or whatever you guys are using)

    Thanks all
     
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  3. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt Thread Starter

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    Eina....

    I meant 'How to mix salt and RO'
     
  4. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

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    what salt are you using normally the salt has a mixing instruction on it. Apply the formula to how much water you are mixing and test with a hydrometer or refractometer. aerate for 24 hours, retest adjust if needed, if correct add to tank.
     
  5. ScottK

    ScottK

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    Completely agree with @butcherman If you are going to be mixing your own water you need some method of testing the salinity or you will be heading for disaster. If you are going to be using a hydrometer instead of a refractometer (highly recommend getting one of these) please got to your LFS or a local reefer and put your hydrometer in their tested water so you can get a guideline of what is the correct level. The indications on most cheap hydrometers is normally slightly out.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  6. Tremayn

    Tremayn

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    if you are using seachem reef salt then @ziyaadb can tell you the grams to liters
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  7. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt Thread Starter

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    I agree.

    Tetra marine sea salt. Have about 10 kgs left. Will buy a different brand next time round.

    Learning the hard way!

    The instruction states 1kg per 25 l.

    Anyone out there as the exact amount to get to 1.026?

    Thanks
     
  8. brentnorm

    brentnorm

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    I use Red Sea Pro Coral Salt and use 38grams per liter.
     
  9. ScottK

    ScottK

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    1kg per 35L sounds about right. Seachem reefsalt is 34 grams per liter, I use about 800-850 grams to make 20L salt mix at 1.025 depending on the batch.

    You are going to have to get something to test the salinity to get the exact amount, also remember that unless you are using the best brands of salt it is likely each batch you buy is going to differ slightly to get the exact figure you want.
     
  10. brentch

    brentch

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    For Red Sea Coral Pro, @ a salinity of; 30.6ppt - 33.4g/l (Fish and non coral inverts) 33ppt - 36g/l (Softies and LPS) 35ppt - 38.2g/l (SPS and clams)...

    This obviously varies between salt brands as they use different ingredients and methods...
     
  11. mandarinman

    mandarinman

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    just remember mix salt into container with full to amount eg 20 litres. This will prevent precipitation ad the salt is able to dissipate into the water without reacting to othwr parts of salt.if you add water to an amount of salt in a container you will end up with water that has all calcium and kh precipitated out.
     
  12. mytank

    mytank

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    The reality is, there is no real one silver bullet. The best is to add salt and test until you get to your unit that you require.

    I know for my 110l mixing drum its 3.5kgs of Seachem Salinity salt.

    You have to test because different salts mix differently with different levels :)

    Good luck
     
  13. brentch

    brentch

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    I just learnt something, elementary, but not something I've ever thought about! Not so much with mixing salt, but for dosing kalk etc....:thumbup:
     
  14. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt Thread Starter

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    Great stuff.

    Thanks guys. My ro unit is running and I am experimenting with getting the mix right.

    Have to use all my tetra salt first. Dont want to waste.

    Tong in cheek....

    What is te best salt out there? Bang for buck?
     
  15. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt Thread Starter

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    Great stuff.

    Thanks guys. My ro unit is running and I am experimenting with getting the mix right.

    Have to use all my tetra salt first. Dont want to waste.

    Tong in cheek....

    What is te best salt out there? Bang for buck?
     
  16. paul bloem

    paul bloem

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    It all depends on what your budget is.
     
  17. Ivyalt

    Ivyalt Thread Starter

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    Bang for buck?

    Best value for money?
     
  18. brentch

    brentch

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    Seachem reef salt seems like a popular one...
     
  19. paul bloem

    paul bloem

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    There is already a thread for the salt.

    Alot of people are happy with different ones but most people use seachem.
    I started with brightwell and my corals did fine, had growth and then went over to aquavitro and my corals did awesome due to what you get from that salt. I did not had to add suplyment and my water was stable because every batch I mixed had the same of everything in.

    I then moved over to seachem when I tarted my bigger system because its cheaper and I do not have corals in and I'm still happy. Now I measure my salt with a glass, with the aquavitro I used 2,5 - 3 glasses " if I remember corectly" and with seachem I use 4,5 glasses.
    So with aquavitro you pay R1600 and can make 900L/30kg and with seachem for R700 you can make about 600L/25kg.

    Just for example, hope you get what I'm trying to explain.
     
  20. brentch

    brentch

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    Yes, it depends on what you want to achieve... If you want rock solid dKH, Ca and Mg readings, something important when housing solely SPS and clams, then Seachem's aquavitro salt is good. It is made under strict controlled conditions. It has parameters very close to seawater. Every bucket is individually tested, and the parameters put on the lid, thus one can choose individual buckets which mirror most closely their own system. However, for someone like me who doses quite high amounts of Ca etc, then something like Red sea's coral pro reef salt is good. It is nice for lower key systems like those that stock mostly LPS, softies and a bit of SPS, and for lazier reefers. It has highly elevated levels of each mineral (Ca, Mg etc) and is suited to smallish weekly water changes so one can supplement less. However, one gets a greater swing in parameters with each water change. Then there is the 'in between', like Seachem reef salt which has slightly elevated parameters allowing one to still dose a little with a slight swing in parameters, and these are also slightly cheaper. As far as I can see, most people use this type.. You just need to chose one that will suit your set up best and what you would like to achieve...
     
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