Flow through skimmer then DSB/fuge

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hi guys,

i'm busy designing my plumbing & atm the flow through my DSB/fuge is dependent on the flow through my skimmer...

will this be a problem? i.e. could i expect to want faster flow through my DSB/fuge than what's going through my skimmer?

with my design i hope to achieve max flow with my return pumps while being able to control the flow going through my skimmers & DSB/fuge...

all excess water that's diverted from the skimmer/DSB/fuge get's pumped straight back without filtering

here's some pics to try explain what i mean (red=ball valve, green=slip union for easy disconnect)


flow1.gif



flow2.gif




flow3.gif




flow4.gif




thanks again

cheers
ant :)
 

Alan

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i'm busy designing my plumbing & atm the flow through my DSB/fuge is dependent on the flow through my skimmer...

will this be a problem? i.e. could i expect to want faster flow through my DSB/fuge than what's going through my skimmer?
Depends on what the flow rate is through the skimmer.
 

jacquesb

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Another possible suggestion, Punk / Alan - would possibly be to add a power-head in the sump in the DSB compartment - to ensure enough flow, and also to allow you to adjust the flow in the DSB area of the sump, at least....
 

viper357

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You don't want too strong a flow going through your DSB/fuge
 

viper357

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Yes definitely, but you don't want a torrential hurricane going through your DSB :D Just enough so that detritus doesn't settle on top of your DSB, the last thing you want your DSB to become is one big detritus trap, you need to keep as much detritus as possible in suspension so that it can be removed by your skimmer. You will more than likely get some settle on top of your DSB but just keep an eye that not too much settles there.
 
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... could i expect to want faster flow through my DSB/fuge than what's going through my skimmer?

with my design i hope to achieve max flow with my return pumps while being able to control the flow going through my skimmers & DSB/fuge...

all excess water that's diverted from the skimmer/DSB/fuge get's pumped straight back without filtering

here's some pics to try explain what i mean (red=ball valve, green=slip union for easy disconnect)
Wow, impressive artwork :thumbup:

Beware of not making the system too complicated - it will be very difficult to "balance" the system with so many valves.

I would suggest you consider installing a second downpipe next to each skimmer downpipe, to handle any excess flow. Place the inlets of these "emergency" pipes slightly above the planned water surface. You can then just use one valve on each skimmer input, and all "excess" water will then flow through the "emergency" downpipes. Make sure these pipes are larger than those going to the skimmers, and they will save the day should something (damn snails...) block one of the "main" skimmer pipes.

One other thing... from your schematics it appears that you are planning to take the water from the bottom of the tank. This is not a good idea, as you would have to allow enough space in the sumps for this volume of water for when the power goes out. Also, long-chain "protein" molecules build up on the water's surface, and it would be best for the skimmers if you supplied them with the dirtyest water "skimmed" from just below the tank's surface.

Hennie
 
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many many thanks for the cool help all you guys

i've never done plumbing so i don't know how practical & difficult this design will be to do

any plumbing tips would be greatly appreciated

hi hennie,
i have full tank length C2C overflows that feed an oveflow box that's drilled (50mm) in each tank... each overflow box will have a durso standpipe. you think i should try get another hole drilled? and wouldn't the C2C's help with the surface skimming?

cheers
ant
:)
 
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... i have full tank length C2C overflows that feed an oveflow box that's drilled (50mm) in each tank... each overflow box will have a durso standpipe. you think i should try get another hole drilled? and wouldn't the C2C's help with the surface skimming?
OK, C2C (if that's corner to corner...) overflow "weir" is good - it sure will skim the surface :thumbup:

If you have not built the tank yet, I would certainly suggest that you drill at least one more hole (50mm would be good) for an emergency downpipe. You can then just have one valve in each downpipe, close the two valves on the skimmer feed pipes to whatever water flow is needed for the skimmers, and let the rest of the water (if any...) flow down the "emergency" downpipe. This way, gravity will do the balancing for you, AND you will have the piece of mind that your tank won't flood if one of the pipes should block.

By the way, 50mm downpipes to feed the skimmers will probably be over-kill, unless you plan on using a swimming pool pump...

... i've never done plumbing so i don't know how practical & difficult this design will be to do... any plumbing tips would be greatly appreciated
Tips:
  • Measure twice, cut once.
  • Lightly sand the PVC pipes (outside) and fittings (inside) with a fine grade (150 - 300 grit) sandpaper, and then clean the sanded areas with asetone just before you glue them.
  • Lightly twist the pipe as you push it into the fitting whilst gluing - don't overdo this, though, a 1/4 of a turn is already too much.
  • PVC pipe (the blue type) can be heated with hot cooking oil, a hot air gun, or even an open flame if you're VERY careful, should you need to fit it over a non-standard fitting. A heated pipe can also be bent to about 30 degrees without losing much flow capacity.
  • Allow the PVC weld glue to set at least 12 hours before applying pressure (pumping water) - 24 hours is better.
  • Don't glue the Durso fittings - unless you're very lucky, you will need to change the hole size a few times before it works optimally, and long-term you will need to remove the fittings to clean them.
Feel free to ask more questions as you go along.

Oh, and good luck with the project...

Hennie
 

Alan

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Beware of not making the system too complicated - it will be very difficult to "balance" the system with so many valves.
I couldn't agree more, the dynamics of water can be very frustrating and lead to plenty wet floors.
 

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