Floor strong enough - any civils?

Discussion in 'Anything DIY Related' started by AdrianTregoning, 20 Dec 2011.

  1. AdrianTregoning

    AdrianTregoning

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    I'm a mechanical engineer, not a civil, so I thought I'd bug you guys :) A standard household floor (this is a ground floor place), do you think it would easily handle a weight of 2000kg? Transfered through six points, obviously with a decent base plates.The floor has a roughly 30mm thick coating throughout, like a fine pebble finish. If need be I'll cut that out to put the system on bare concrete which would be underneath. I'm going to contact the manufacturer of the finish to find out the compressive strength of that covering anyway..

    I was wondering, because I read of the user 'Reef Maniac' from Bloem having his tank burst... I'd imagine a very solid stand evenly distributing the forces would nullify any slight movements from the floor. I don't know, I don't know my civils too well :blush: Any ideas? My gut tells me the floor will be fine and I'm wasting your time, but probably without resting it on the existing floor. But I'd rather check, just to be sure. :whistling: By the way, the floor looks like this:


    [​IMG]
     
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  3. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Floor should be fine
    2000kg by 6 legs is 333kg per leg. On a base plate. No problem

    Family sized sedan say 1600kg is 400 kg on basically the same footprint than you would get when the tank stand on base plates.
     
  4. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Good advice and nice analogy
     
  5. seank

    seank

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    Surface beds- if done correctly, is suppose to be 20 mPa (in light Residential) with an 85 mm Thickness, and should have REF 193 mesh for plastic shrinkage. (But then again, you never know who did the build, and if They did follow specs.
    The 30mm cover (screed) is not sufficient anyway. I'd rather cast a thicker reinforced slab on top of it, or, if you want, cut the existing slab out, cast another stronger and thicker one, and put your screed back, with a bit more strength
     
  6. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    also @Manic
    what's your opinion
     
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  7. seank

    seank

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    Garage floors is normally stronger and thicker, and if you think of tar roads or paving strength, remember that they do have flexibility
     
  8. AdrianTregoning

    AdrianTregoning Thread Starter

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    Excellent! Thanks everyone :) :thumbup: I'll probably cut out the existing stone covering which is probably only a fine stone mixed with epoxy setup which could creep in the long term, I suspect.
     
  9. LuckyFish

    LuckyFish MASA Contributor

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    Pretty much the best advice IMO here.

    To be safe, put a plastic sheet over the existing floor and cast a thick, reinforced slab on top of it. In the size of your stand/cabinet. In case you are removing the tank one day, you can easily remove the new slab as it doesn't bond to the ground, because of the sheet in between. And when the sheet is removed, the floor will look like it's looking now.
     
    AdrianTregoning and dallasg like this.
  10. AdrianTregoning

    AdrianTregoning Thread Starter

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    :slayer: Thanks! And last day at work today, so let the planning begin :biggrin:
     
  11. seank

    seank

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    Good idea Marcel. Good luck with the planning Adrian
     
  12. ReefMaster

    ReefMaster

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    Dont forget another important component that helps to stabilise the tank and that is inserting a layer of polystyrene foam between the base and the glass tank. If you want to be safe, you can use a thicker layer

    Good Luck and send us pics

     
  13. frankie fish

    frankie fish

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    I am in no way a engineer,but wouldn't this create a weak spot,creating a loose slab,and when u fill the tank,the loose slab cracks? Then again,my tank is standing on tiles,which may have hollow areas,and no cracks or anything bad(touch wood):whistling: just my 2c
     
  14. LuckyFish

    LuckyFish MASA Contributor

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    If the loose reinforced slab would crack, the original floor would crack too. So where to start and where to stop with being safe?;)
     
  15. AdrianTregoning

    AdrianTregoning Thread Starter

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    Indeed. Doing a design using Inventor, so I'll post pics of the tank/sump and get it approved from the masters - you :yeahdude: please :whistling:
     
  16. frankie fish

    frankie fish

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    No,the original floor won't crack. simple example,take a thin brick,place it in a hole on a concrete floor,so it will be loose. then drive over it,you will see that it most probably cracked. now if u placed the same brick in the same hole(note,level with the floor),and cement it to the floor,it probably won't crack. Like i said,i'm not a engineer,i can only add a opinion.
     
  17. mupwi

    mupwi

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    im liking the idea of the new slab over the old one with plastic in between how thick what reinforcing ect would be required for this
     
  18. Tremayn

    Tremayn

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    good advice here. I would have just told him to get 6 fat ladies to stand there :lol:
     
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