Disrupting DSB.

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by Broder, 11 May 2010.

  1. Broder

    Broder Mudshark

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    East London
    Hi Hennie. One of the local reefers has asked me for some sand from my DBS to seed his own new one. This practice seems to be quite common as you often hear of similar requests. I'm not particularly convinced that it's a good idea though. Ok, I know that the DSB will recover in no time at all, but it is a good 5% of the footprint that is temporarily interrupted, and there will be further anaerobic bacterial die-off as oxygenated water reaches new regions. Could this cause a chain reaction? Would I be releasing anything bound in the DSB into the water column?

    I'd appreciate you esteemed opinion on the subject.

    Broder.
     
  2. AdS Guest




    to hide all adverts.
  3. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

    Joined:
    7 Sep 2009
    Posts:
    11,626
    Likes Received:
    280
    Location:
    Kempton Park
    Sorry to add a few questions Mudshark but i think they are also relevant to the subject.
    What exactly is it we are hopping to seed the dsb with? since the anaerobic bacteria will die when exposed to O2. is the the little critters one has living in their DSB's
    Also when one takes sand from a DSB should it be like a cross section of one spot or just a little sample off the top?
     
  4. Broder

    Broder Thread Starter Mudshark

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    East London
    Thanks for adding Butcherman. Good questions.
     
  5. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    23,165
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Centurion
    Just a single deep scoop from the top. One action. Like when you scoop icecream, but not frozen rock solid icecream.

    And you have to re-seed your DSB every couple of months. Because it is a closed environment and let me use for this example that you have 100 different type of lifeforms in your DSB. Because of growth and natural competetion, some live forms will aoutcompete others and drive them to extinction. So eventually you end up with only 50 or less different types of lifeforms. Over time this becomes worst as more and more types are driven to extinction by the dominant organism.

    By re-seeding the DSB, you are introducing some new organisms to your closed environment. That hopefully can withstand or stand up against the strongest organisms. Thereby disturbing the natural balance (however messed up it is) and resetting the scales back to the lesser organisms.

    And your DSB, when you remove a cup, should not be affected.
     
  6. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

    Joined:
    15 May 2007
    Posts:
    2,899
    Likes Received:
    112
    Location:
    Bloemfontein
    Good answer, Riaan.

    No, not in my experience.

    Yes, IF your DSB has a "black zone" and you dig into this, you might release some toxic substances. I have never heared of this causing a problem, though, and as long as you don't dig into any black zone you should be totally safe.

    Most of the life-forms in the sand live in the top half of the sand bed, so you don't have to dig/scoop down very deep either. Oh, and just to confirm, the idea is to relocate some of the microscopic (and perhaps somewhat larger) life forms in the sand, not the bacteria... they will grow without any seeding.

    Hennie
     
  7. Broder

    Broder Thread Starter Mudshark

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    32
    Location:
    East London
    Thanks. Although, I'm not convinced about the need to re-seed a DSB. I've never seeded mine and it has progressively increased in biodiversity over the years.
     
  8. biovolt

    biovolt

    Joined:
    9 May 2011
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Is the only way to seed a DSB to get sand from a fellow Reefer?

    What is the options?
     
  9. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    29 May 2007
    Posts:
    17,868
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Biovolt - yes, basically. That, and to add really good quality live rock to your tank. If you just add the live rock, then your DSB will still be seeded, but it might just take a week or two longer.
     
  10. biovolt

    biovolt

    Joined:
    9 May 2011
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Thank you!

    Sorry for all the newbie questions!

    What is "good quality live rock" and what is NOT good quality live rock?
     
  11. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    8,384
    Likes Received:
    286
    Location:
    Joe's Mountain
    Depends if you are talking about buying cured or newly landed.

    When purchasing so called "cured" live rock and paying a premium price, always insist on a water parameter test of the water the LR is stored in. If the NO3 and PO4 is way out move on. You will only have to redo the curing process and inherit problems you do not want.

    It is always best to pre-order LR and receive it as landed by your LFS. It will be dry. (the rock is moist and the moisture is contained within the rock with Phosphate ink printed newspaper) yes ironic. It is a little cheaper as it is lighter but will require your processing regime to ensure "PO4" and pests are eliminated.

    Often one pays more for a more exotic named LR. Economics or marketing i suppose. Figi LR is reportedly very good and costly. Knowing the shipping and collecting procedures i am not sure the benefit is worth the asking price.

    LR that has not been handled correctly, or LR that that for whatever reason, has been subjected to long term high nutrients and abuse. Needs to be recycled via a dry-out and acid wash to remove nutrients, especially PO4 that is bound to the calcium structure of the rock.
     
Recent Posts