Dana Riddle's Articles on Lighting

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by scubaninja, 26 Apr 2012.

  1. scubaninja

    scubaninja

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    Been going through an article of Dana Riddle's after the suggestion. It's quite intense 'reading' as expected, but for those interested here is the link to the first one I am reading. Depending on how time goes, maybe if time is kind to me I'll try to do another 'important fact' summary and hopefully have all the facts correct this time. IF not @jaime is going to have to correct me again :p
     
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  3. scubaninja

    scubaninja Thread Starter

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  4. Jamie@Vertex

    Jamie@Vertex

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    scuby, et al,

    a note to all reading these articles. Do not mix up adsorbtion and emmision wavelengths with pigment production wavelengths. We have a tendency to 'read' what we want out of such articles and can easily come to incorrect conclusions.

    The production of a pigment is not the same as its light-emmiting or reflecting properties. A pigment may require wavelengths between 390nm-450nm to be produced, but expresses its colour under 500nm and emmits at 540nm. Although, in theory, we may have pigments that use wavelengths very close together for both processes, they are still seperate processes.

    Jamie
     
  5. scubaninja

    scubaninja Thread Starter

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    I did wonder about there being different wavelengths noted and what was going on with them. Is this the simplified break down :

    For a chromoprotein pigment(non-fluorescent pigment), a coral will take in a certain wavelength of light(absorption) and produce the related pigment. Once produced, the pigment will reflect a certain wavelength of light(the "excess" wavelengths past its maximum absorption) and show a colour that is the combination of wavelengths reflected.

    If it is a fluorescent pigment, some of the light absorbed is emitted(fluorescence) at another wavelength(as though it has been "processed" from the original wavelength).
     
  6. Jamie@Vertex

    Jamie@Vertex

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    I think you have grasped the situation. We have two mechanisms at work, that are independant in their biology. Pigment production and pigment optical qualities.

    On the theme of pigment production, the actual light spectrum is key to the pigments produced. Of course, there is a genetic factor, but, without the required wavelengths, a GFP (green fluorescent protien) may remain green, while with just a touch of a specific UV wavelength, changes to orange and/or red. Very different optical qualities. If we think of radiation as energy, which it is, of course, it is easier to understand the complex processes that may happen. Certain types and amounts of energy produce different final chemical compounds.

    And we are still learning....

    Jamie
     
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  7. scubaninja

    scubaninja Thread Starter

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    Yes it truly is remarkable field to study. I find the Kaede pigments are quite fascinating, I have not read through all the links I have posted but I think the basic message has been put forward. For actual use of the data it would be best to use the tables in the articles to formulate the light wavelengths we plan on using for our aquariums.

    Thanks for the knowledge bomb:thumbup:
     
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