Could Caynobacteria outbreaks be seasonally linked

Discussion in 'Nuisance Algae' started by FransSny, 2 Aug 2011.

  1. FransSny

    FransSny

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    Having chatted to a few different reefers (both from MASA and others not) it seems like there is a bit of a Cayno outbreak doing the rounds at the moment.

    This has started making me think that maybe seasons could have something to do with this. Reasoning being:


    • Everyone is running their tanks differently , so we cant all be making the same mistake.
    • Some of these guys have run their tanks for months without any issues and have just "picked" up issues over the last few weeks.
    • Nobody I have spoken to has changed anything major
    I myself is having one, taking into account I use NSW , just buffed for pH , RO etc etc...

    Any thoughts on this. I have looked a bit on Google but haven't really found anything
     
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  3. leslie hempel

    leslie hempel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    i would say it could be and found guys got it more here in summer than in winter but i think there are various reasons for this

    east london guys generally start their tanks in winter in anticipation for the summer fish season and tend to overload their tank as tropical species become freely abundant..

    but my explination for winter is that people tend to loose interest as there are not to many fish about and start to slack on water changes...

    i personally have found that i get a small patch from time to time in my gravel (between the front glass and the gravel bed).. which comes and goes.. and increased temperatures seem to allow it to populate more freely..

    so directly linked to a season? it could quite possibly be but in the 2 scenarios i have illustrated above it could be the simulation of a season through the use of heaters during start up that could be offering a simular setting..

    hope that makes sence...
     
  4. carlosdeandrade

    carlosdeandrade

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  5. Tony

    Tony

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    The water is also much cooler in winter and as we know cooler water holds more oxygen. In summer when things heat up cyano problems tend to start as O2 levels drop.
     
  6. rakabos

    rakabos

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    Why would it be seasonal if your tank runs at the same temp all year long ?

    Mine is always range bound 25C - 28C, and I have cyano on/off throughout...
     
  7. leslie hempel

    leslie hempel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    or an overstocked system with a filtration system either too small or batteling to build up enough bacteria to assist in consuming the excess waster, but i am definatley in agreement with tony on the oxygen comment...
     
  8. Tony

    Tony

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    Maarten that 3 degree fluctuation can affect O2 levels dramatically. Cyano has been linked to low O2 levels whic is it is suggested you point powerheads to break the water's surface or increase flow in poorly circulated and/or deep tanks
     
  9. Tony

    Tony

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  10. rakabos

    rakabos

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    Why oh why did evolution not create a cyano eating tang or snail :p
     
  11. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    some snails do eat cyano.
     
  12. Tony

    Tony

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    I know the feeling but cyano(which I had a fair problem with myself)) and dinoflagellates have been linked to the recovery of the seas/world (not too sure), post the asteroid just about destroying the planet a gizillion years ago. A bit of useless trivia:p
     
  13. mandarinman

    mandarinman

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    there is one that eats cyano, it is called a mexican turbo snail.:tt2:
     
  14. mandarinman

    mandarinman

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    if you dose carbon source and you dont have a strong enough skimmer or enough other bacteria, cyano will flourish.(carbon sources feed bacteria and cyano is a bacteria)
     
  15. Achilles

    Achilles

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    going to throw a cat among pigeons here and also say that adding live bacteria cultures might also increase cyanobacteria . In fact how do you know some of the strains in the cultures arent Cyano- they also chow nitrate and phosphate but kill corals and make tank look ugly
     
    Last edited: 2 Aug 2011
  16. FransSny

    FransSny Thread Starter

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    Interesting ...I was also wondering along those lines (especially with the amount of products out there...and not all being forthcoming in terms of what strains they use etc).

    I was however wondering weather increased bacteria levels could not be lowering O2 levels during the normal biological processes
     
  17. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    DO and excess CO2 are IMO the biggest contributors to Cyano.
    If DO is = < 6 cyno normaly occurs.
     
  18. Achilles

    Achilles

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    Well that makes sense then that adding aerobic bacteria would result in a reduction of oxygen and a resultant increase in Co2 leading to cyano outbreaks its fine balance on a balance beam with these systems
     
  19. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    :thumbup: 100's
     
  20. Alan

    Alan Admin MASA Contributor

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    Agreed, but our systems also have a wonderful way of balancing themselves out again.
     
  21. Tony

    Tony

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    Dominant strain of bacteria will consume lesser bacteria which is known as old tank syndrome. We constantly replenish the bacteria in our aquariums constantly repopulating strains that may have dis back from a lack of food or which have been consumed by a dominant strain. I dont think cyano actively eats/feeds on our bacteria in our tanks as I had a bad dose of cyano a few months back with aggresive probiotic dosing. Only when I switched carbon sources (from vodka to sugar) did I see the cyano die back. The negative to the sugar dosing was an increase in phosphates whereas vodka kept both N and P in check.

    To add to Nemos reasons for cyano along with low DO and high CO2 levels is, high DOC levels, carbon dosing, amino acid dosing, deep and poorly circulated tanks which trap CO2, temperature and salinity (these affect the amount of DO in water), poor surface skimming of the tank and a lot of fish which deplete oxygen levels. The first few points are foods for the cyano and the last few have to do with low DO levels.

    I would like to debate the reduced light cycle. Surely turning off lights for longer increases the CO2 in tanks as photosynthesis is reversed aggravating the O2 problem. Shouldn't the light be on for longer to promote O2 production?
     
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