Urgent help needed Corals not doing well!!

Discussion in 'Urgent Help Needed' started by dominodeluxe, 14 Nov 2011.

  1. dominodeluxe

    dominodeluxe

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    Hi I've had my new tank 240l going for about 4/5 months and everything was doing super my green star polyps multiplying like neva before,the leather growing well......overall the tank was doing great. I went away for a long weekend and when i came back my leather became this huge white blub...a few days later nothing remained.
    my hammer also started to almost not come out so i started adding salt to get it from 1.020 to 1.023. I also added 2 T5's.

    Nothing is seeming to help in the meantime i also added a dsb.

    Help will be appreciated!!
     
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  3. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Please post your tanks parameters.
    What was done to your tank while you were away?
    HAve you done a waterchange since the leather died?
     
  4. Alan

    Alan Admin MASA Contributor

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    Agree with above, we need parameters including the highest temp the tank got to.
     
  5. dominodeluxe

    dominodeluxe Thread Starter

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    Just did the tests.

    Parameters:
    Nitrate:0.5ppm
    Phosphate:0.05
    Salinity:1.021
    My strip thermometer says 28 degrees is the highest it got to.
     
  6. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    You need to check ammonia as well.
    Also get hold of a different thermomenter to measure the temp. A temp spike could have caused the death of the corals.
    Salinity is also a bit low, start bringing that up slowly to 1.024
     
  7. dominodeluxe

    dominodeluxe Thread Starter

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    I've got the API reef master test kit and only when I got home did i realize that it doesn't test ammonia so I won't beable to test that one. But shouldn't the ammonia be down since the phosphates and nitrates are low?
     
  8. dominodeluxe

    dominodeluxe Thread Starter

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    I also thought I must get my dsb seeded so the one guy suggested to get prodibio digest and with a syringe inject the vial content deep into the dsb do u think thats better than getting a cup of sand??
     
  9. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Not neccessarily. Ammonia gets broken down into nitrite then nitrate. Just cause the nitrates are low doesnt mean there is no ammonia.

    Id suggest you rather get the current issue sorted before worrying too much about the DSB. A dsb is not a quick fix and does take a few month to start working properly.
     
    Evo R likes this.
  10. dominodeluxe

    dominodeluxe Thread Starter

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    Thanks will do!
     
  11. Evo R

    Evo R

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    Who looked after your tank when you where away? And if someone looked after your tank, ask them to explain in detail everything they did. They might have accidently poisoned your tank and now your corals are suffering. Also did you do a water change after the first coral died? When a coral dies it fowls the water by rotting away aswell as give of toxins. This could set off a chain reaction! So if you have not done a WC yet... id strongly advise it!!!
     
    Last edited: 14 Nov 2011
  12. Duri

    Duri

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    I had a similar issues just my corals didnt die, most of them just didn't want to open or did open but poorly... turns out my ph was low like 5. added 3 spoons disolved baking soda (1tablespoon every hour) and they started to open slowly over those 3 hours!

    skimmer is also important
     
  13. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    @459b and others, lets get into the habit of using the correct terminology. Salinity is referred to in ppt and is not temp influenced. Bud I am not having a go at you, just trying to get a better understanding amongst the reefers as to the difference.:thumbup:

    The reading and referal is that of SG, specific gravity, which is temp influenced. So before increasing the SG test the SG at a temperature. We need to get into the habit of including the temperature when receiving and giving advice on SG readings. The SG will vary between 20c & I suspect some 30c+ in this case.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
    finrott likes this.
  14. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Sorry Uncle, naughty corner for me again?
    Yopu are correct and I shall make an effort to use the correct sg/ppt from now on.
     
  15. butcherman

    butcherman Moderator MASA Contributor

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    @Nemos Janitor a good point how much will SG vary in lets say from 25 degrees to 30 degrees?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  16. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    Depends on the calibration temperature of the testing instrument.

    Some hydrometers are calibrated at 15c some at 20c and others at 25c. Most at 15c.

    Most refractometers are calibrated at 20c


    A hydrometer that is calibrated at 15c and measures a SG of 1.020 in a 30c solution, the correction will be to 1.0235
    And at 25c 1.0221

    On average about 0.00144 per 5c
     
    Last edited: 14 Nov 2011
  17. robvdv

    robvdv

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    If you're in Hermanus, measure your metering device against seawater. My swing arm started to drift over time from 1.026 to 1.024. I re-calibrated against seawater to verify.

    Be aware that seawater can vary after rain, near rivers etc., so it's not 100%, but it's a nice backup test. I keep a bottle of sea water handy for this purpose.
     
  18. AndreM

    AndreM

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    From the literature that came with my D&D H2Ocean Saltwater refractometer that temperature is used for calibration because it's the most common 'room temperature'. Because the volume of water you are testing is so little it changes to the temperature of your refractometer when you put the few drops on there.

    Does this mean that the temperature of your tank doesn't really matter when using a refractometer, but the temperature of your refractometer will? (Of course, an ATC will compensate for this).
     
  19. Jeann1

    Jeann1

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    Thats what I understood from the literature. I also have the DD H20cean Saltwater Refractometer.

    They also go into a bit more detail about the way they calibrate the unit and the difference between standard refractometer and the DD version..
     
  20. Braco

    Braco

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    tagging along;)
     
  21. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    5


    The D-D saltwater refractometer is calibrated when the instrument is at 20c. Once calibrated at 20c it will give you correct readings no mater what the water temp is. As it is an ATC refractor enter it will give correct readings if the instrument is in the range of 10- 40c

    Issues arise if you calibrate the refractometer outside of the 20c.

    Example. You calibrate the instrument at 25c. The salinity of the sample water you are testing is 35.5 ppt or 1,026 @ c25c you will measure a sg of 1.0246. This could result in, if action is taken to lift the salinity, a sg of 1.028 @25c.

    With non ATC refractometers the the instrument needs to be calibrated at the indicated calibration temperature and the sample water must also be tested when the instrument is at the calibration temperature.


    Here is an old link that explains it rather well.

    Salinity vs Specific Gravity
     
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