Coral survival after the KT impact

Discussion in 'Diving, Collecting and Environmental Discussions' started by Warr7207, 31 May 2009.

  1. Warr7207

    Warr7207

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    There are loads of articles about how the wild corals of the Earth's oceans will be wiped out with in the next 50 years because of global warming and the sea temperatures increasing by a couple of degrees.

    What I would like to know, is how did corals survive the KT Impact of 65 million years ago, that wiped out the dinosaurs and 75% of all existing families (at the time). Family is the level above Genus and below Order in the grand hierarchy of life.
    This is also know as the Cretaceous Extinction.

    Keeping in mind that the Impact was so huge. To calculate the force, here is an example, if you took the size of Hiroshima Atom bomb and multiplied it by all the people currently living on Earth (6 Billion) you would still be about a Billion mega-tonnes short.

    Now we all know how Coral require algae, which in turn requires light, and sustained large amounts of it. How would these creatures survive a global black-out, that lasted years. Also the oceans chemistry must have changed, with the amounts of Acid rain, due to the nature of the geology of the impact site.

    Any guesses out there ?
     
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  3. seank

    seank

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    Wow Warren, you do not go on easy questions after a nice Sunday afternoon nap....:lol:

    Would love to know the answer to your question though
     
  4. martinhal

    martinhal

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    Perhaps the KT event changed the water chemistry to what it is now....
     
  5. scubaninja

    scubaninja

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    it was aliens. aliens i tell you. they're playing with our minds!
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. Fishy Steve

    Fishy Steve Hiden super user

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    Maybe the light loving corals died off and then when the sun came out to play again the deepwater corals adapted again to the ones we know and love now. Lets face it they have had 65 Million years to repopulate. This is just a theory as is the Kt impact.
     
  7. Warr7207

    Warr7207 Thread Starter

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    Very true.

    But think of this.

    If the deep "non-light" loving corals evolved into the corals of today, why go backwards ? (in evolution terms) Let's face it, the corals of today are very sensitive to change. The corals of 65 million years ago must have been really hardy to survive the sulphuric acid oceans of the time.

    I wonder if there are any of these hardy ancestors still around today ?

    Another thing I have been wondering about. Giant clams and Sea urchins are found in the fossil record before this extinction event, how the hell did these guys make it ?
     
  8. Tony

    Tony

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    I think corals only evolved afterwards.
     
  9. Warr7207

    Warr7207 Thread Starter

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    Nope, there are loads of corals in the fossil record before this event. And they are very similar to the creatures we keep in our tanks today :)

    Interesting enough, it is estimated that only about 0,1% of all species that have ever existed have been found and identified in the fossil record.
     
  10. Tony

    Tony

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    Non photosynthetic corals, plancton, sponges would have survived but all photosynthetic corals were killed
     
  11. scubaninja

    scubaninja

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    hey warr about some fossil corals bein alive today i know of one. on a tank on zeovit.com, ed's shallow reef, he had this coral that noone could identify and eventually they found out its a 100 million year old living fossil:) he posted a link for some info, will get it now now for you
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  12. scubaninja

    scubaninja

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    and a link to his thread, here is the coral itself before he started getting PE

     
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