1. Copperband

    Copperband

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    Guys I've read an article where it states that due to high levels of CO2 in the Oceans certain species have their calcium "shells" dissolved.

    "CO2 forms carbonic acid when it dissolves in water, and the oceans are soaking up more and more of it. Recent studies show that the seas have absorbed about a third of all the fossil-fuel carbon released into the atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial revolution, and they will soak up far more over the next century. Yet until quite recently many people dismissed the idea that humanity could alter the acidity of the oceans, which cover 71 per cent of the planet's surface to an average depth of about 4 kilometers. The ocean's natural buffering capacity was assumed to be capable of preventing any changes in acidity even with a massive increase in CO2 levels"

    Now my question is, is it possible for the CO2 we use for our Ca reactors to cause the same issue in our tanks? I know we try and buffer our tank water but and there's always a but..
     
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  3. DragonReef

    DragonReef

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    CB that article sounds like a bit media hype in all honesty.

    I would like to see the scientific data that they presented with these findings.

    The PH of sea water would have to drop to around 6 for shells to start dissolving. At that sort of PH far more catostrophic things would be occuring then a few shells dissolving.
    In our tanks that run CO2 reactors, it's the PH in the reactor that drops down to around 6.5. The discharge or effluent is dripped in slowly and might account for an overall drop of .2 or .3 at worst. Even if your tank PH dropped as low as 7.8 it would be nowhere near enough to start dissolving anything.

    JMHO
     
  4. Copperband

    Copperband Thread Starter

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  5. sunburst

    sunburst

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    Thanks Copper. Great read.
    I listened to the last UN release on global warming on BBC and one lesser known fact that they discussed was not if the Ph of the sea would change, but the speed that it would change.... There findings showed that the Ph was changing faster than their calculations had predicted.

    Regarding your tank....the reason why the use of a kalk reactor (or kalk) with a calcium reactor is so popular is because the kalk neutralisers the effect of carbonic acid.....earth does not have a kalk reactor

    The world is one big carbon sink.... ie our coral and...the amazon jungle adsorbs our carbon pollution. The more carbon the faster trees grow...collecting and neutralizing more carbon. Problem is.... there is a limit to the speed of this assimilation.

    So even if the earth were'nt heating up.....and we were'nt cutting down trees..... the accelerated release of carbon at the current rate will eventually exhaust the seas buffering effect and the drop in Ph is inevitable ...and will slow calcification.... as we know it.
     
    Last edited: 24 May 2007
  6. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    nice info guys.global warming is having a terrible impact in our atmosphere and waters
     
  7. Copperband

    Copperband Thread Starter

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    Ok lets change the angle. Is there a possibility that by some form of mishap CO2 gets dumped into your tank?
     
  8. palmerc

    palmerc

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    Well I suppose if the regulator breaks and pumps CO2 uncontrollably, or you do not have any media in the reactor.

    In light of the article, higher atmospheric CO2 levels will not affect our tanks at all, as we all need to add additional buffer.
     
  9. Copperband

    Copperband Thread Starter

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    k gotcha thanx.
     
  10. sunburst

    sunburst

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    Last edited by a moderator: 6 Jan 2008
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