Brine Shrimp Breeding

Discussion in 'Breeding fish' started by Jaco Schoeman, 3 Jun 2010.

  1. Jaco Schoeman

    Jaco Schoeman MASA Contributor

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    Hi guys

    Just a question. To hatch live brine is a walk in the park, but how does one get them to the next levels, and grow into larger specimens? Do they now require a food source like Rotifier or planktonic foods etc?

    Is it maybe just easier to feed the nuapli, and buy the larger live brine from the LFS?

    Thanks;)
     
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  3. mandarinman

    mandarinman

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    phytoplankton and regular water changes
     
  4. Trev

    Trev

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    I got bored once and grew out some brine shrimp I fed them on and in this order dry yeast, boiled egg yellow, pronutro and egg yellow and they grew out for about three months, it is actualy a bit of a challenge to do.Give it a try
     
  5. LuckyFish

    LuckyFish MASA Contributor

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    I totally agree with Glen. The biggest problem is the oxygen level if you want quantity.
    The best way to do it, is to grow phytoplankton as explained in my thread and once you got the 20 litre running, dump a few hundred naupli in there. They will grow and multiply. If you would add a few thousand naupli, the culture would crash. You need another algae culture, better two as a food source. The algae takes the waste products out and keeps the oxygen level up.
    It works with yeast as well, but you have to do water changes more often.
     
  6. Sentari

    Sentari

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  7. Anemone

    Anemone

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    Growing brine shrimp to adult size has been a huge problem for me. As Marcel stated, when you add a few thousand the culture usually crashes. A few hundred are a waste of time for me.
     
  8. LuckyFish

    LuckyFish MASA Contributor

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    I did it once and grew a few thousand out. I used this thing in the middle for oxygen.
    As far as I remember, it is not available in SA. And I got no clue what it is called in english. I gets filled with hydrogenperoxide.
    I was so proud to have achieved this and instead of feeding them to my fish as planned, I kept them until one night the whole culture crashed. Not one was left.

    [​IMG]

    The tank size was 60 x 40 x 40cm and plumbed into the DT system. I did not feed phytoplankton.
     
  9. Jaco Schoeman

    Jaco Schoeman Thread Starter MASA Contributor

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    Thank you for the input...

    Just a few questions though:

    1) I am only needing to feed two adult mandarins at this stage (no fry)... Do I need such quantities? I do however need to have constant food available, in order to wean them from live brine to frozen...
    2) Does the phyto culture need to be alive for the food source, or will the "off the shelf" phyto work for food too? I know this will not work for filtration purposes.
    3) Does one need to enrich your brine with vitamins before feeding to adult fish? If so, what works best and how to I do it? I read you soak them for about 10mins, is that sufficient?
     
  10. Jaco Schoeman

    Jaco Schoeman Thread Starter MASA Contributor

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    Bump...

    Sorry guys, just need to know this urgently:

    Can I give brine shrimp TM Phyto or Brightwell Phyto instead of live phyto? I have done research and answered most other questions myself... ;)
     
  11. hypn

    hypn

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    Hi Jaco,

    I use to be the original supplier of Sea-monkeys in South Africa. The secret definitely lies in oxygenation and food source. They are incredibly susceptible to death approx. 4 - 5 days after hatching which will see most of your newly hatched die.

    Food needs to be supplied in small amounts and less is always better. I still have some packets of "sea Monkey instant food" at home, I could gladly supply you with a packet, PM me if you are interested.

    Can anybody maybe shed some light on who the brine-shrimp pet-shop supplier is in JHB, I believe she is running the hatchery from Benoni, and those Brine look pretty good.

    There use to be a marine dealer in Yeoville who had the most incredible supply of enriched brine-shrimp but I am talking years ago, anybody know what happened to the owner or even who he was (initially a German guy called Vim who then sold), because they had the growing brine-shrimp down to perfection
     
  12. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Just a question, is an airstone better, or should a steady supply of bigger bubbles be OK? Like in Luckyfish's pic.

    I want to be able to keep live brine alive for a week at least to be able to feed and train a Coperband. At the end of that week, I can get another supply of live brine.

    I got a small airpump with airstone into a small glass box, but by day 4 it all goes south. Water turns milky with type of foam forming and they mostly die off.

    What must the water temp be?
    What must the salinity be?
    What is an OK food source for adults. Somthing simple that will not polute the water.
     
  13. hypn

    hypn

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    Brine-shrimp

    Am I right in saying that you are buying the already "packaged" brine-Shrimp at your local Pet Store ? If this is the case, take them out of the water they are in - the water that they are in goes "south" before them.

    Normal salinity (same as marine) is fine higher salinity for higher egg hatching rates lower for longer living. Once you have replaced the water - place them in the fridge (yes you read right). If you have to feed them, which is really not needed for the weekly supplied ones, I suggest "yeast" but only once a week and a very small amount.

    If you are Hatching from eggs, do not feed at all for the first 4 - 7 days, 90% of the Sea-Monkeys we supplied to stores were killed by people feeding them, they will easily live and grow for 4 days eating from the egg sack attached at birth, thereafter a pinch of yeast once a week depending on the amount alive. Airstone is good but don't go for fine bubbles. There will be a massive decline in population after approx. 4 days, bacterial infection and mother nature just has their way ?

    I hope all this info helps but PM if I could be of more help.

    The best rule I always told "Sea-monkey" buyers were to LEAVE THEM ALONE. They thrive if they are treated like a ant instead of a animal - lol

    Regards

    Andre
     
  14. RiaanP

    RiaanP Moderator

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    Yes packaged.
    I gave them a small amount of Coral Frenzy.

    ok, lower temps. Had the container with them floating in the quarantine tank to keep temp up. OK, will take it out.

    Container with brine shrimp and airpump inside fridge surely will not go down very good with non-reefer. :)
    Luckily I got my own Lapa fridge. :thumbup:
     
  15. hypn

    hypn

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    Oops - no leave the airpump !!!!! not needed when they go into the fridge, Temperature slows down their entire metabolism making it work, just hide it behind the food before visitors arrive.
     
  16. Anemone

    Anemone

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    I’ve never kept a mandarin, but keep in mind it takes a few weeks to get brine to adult size and you will likely have some die off.



    Both will work, but IMO live is better, as anything else fouls the water quicker.



    I enrich for 24 hours before feeding, and I change the water, rinse the brine, and re-enrich after the first 12 hours. Unfortunately, I don’t know what enrichment products are available in SA.



    Air stones are not recommended. From what I’ve read, the tiny bubbles can kill the brine.




    That’s interesting. Every thing I read tells me to start feeding 12 hours after hatch.


    Also, if you guys can get a copy of the Plankton Culture Manual, I think you will find it helpful.
     
  17. hypn

    hypn

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    Hi Anemone, after the weeks of Brine-Shrimp hatching you have had too do, I would follow your advice to a T. Your Sea-Horse made sure you learned what had to be learned and quickly, and the healthy guys are all proof of this.

    I think the difference in when to feed has more to do with newly hatched versus fully grown. I would still not feed newly hatched Brine for the first three days BUT I agree that the nutritional value to other animals by then has become obsolete and enrichment needs to take place before feeding. (amount of live brine versus nutritional feed)

    One other thing to consider is that the pre-packaged live Brine Shrimp in South Africa are pretty good quality (and no I am not linked to the distributor), and are already at a LARGE size. Enriching can only be beneficial at this time.

    A word of warning however is that we are having a chilly winter and the Brine Shrimp does tend to decline in size and nutritional appearance this time of the year. (I am referring to the Pet-shop purchased ones). Enriching Brine-Shrimp is NEVER a bad idea
     
  18. Anemone

    Anemone

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    Hatching is easy, growing to adult can be a nightmare. I am still not anywhere near where I need to be with growout. It’s a work in progress…..

    Those seahorses ate a LOT of tiny brine several times a day!



    You guys are lucky I can type 85 words a minute…..From the Plankton Culture Manual:

    “If nauplii are not fed 12 hours after hatching, they rapidly lose weight and caloric value. Unfed Instar II nauplii lose 20% of their weight and 27% of their caloric value by the time they molt to Instar III (about 24 hours). Starving nauplii have little nutritional value.

    If properly fed, favorable compositional changes also occur as Artemia grow from nauplii to adults. The dry weight of nauplii is 20% lipid and 42% protein as compared to 10% lipid and 60% protein in adults. Nauplii are known to be deficient in amino acids histidine, methionine, phenylalanine and theronine, while adults are rich in all essential amino acids. Adult Artemia therefore supply more biomass than nauplii and are more nutritionally complete.”

    Types of feed, also from the Plankton Culture Manual:

    “Since they are non-selective filter feeders, a wide range of living and inert foods have been used successfully to culture brine shrimp. Criteria for food selection is based on particle size (<50 to 60 um), digestibility, solubility. Feeds with high solubility should be pre-soaked or avoided.

    Microalgae that have been used as feeds include Nannochloropsis, Dunaliella, Chaetoceros, Phaeodactylum, Tetraselmis, and Isochrysis. A wide variety of inert foods are also acceptable, but as with any inert food, water quality problems can easily develop from over feeding. Inert feeds include active and inactive yeast, micronized rice bran, whey, wheat flour, soybean powder, fish meal, egg yolk, and homogenized liver. Dried microalgae such as Spirulina, Scenedesmus and Tetraselmis have also been used successfully. Bacteria growing on dried foods contribute significantly to their nutritional value (Doulliet, 1987). Some types of bacteria cells can themselves serve as an effective food source for Artemia (Intriago and Jones, 1993).”




    They may be excellent quality on arrival……for brine. However adult brine alone is not quality food for marine fish. This is where enrichment comes in.
     
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