Baking soda

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by Boegie, 16 Aug 2011.

  1. Boegie

    Boegie

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    What is your experience with dosing baking soda for alkalinity?
    I heat water in the microwave, not boiling, just hot enough. Then mix the desired amount as per calculator to the water.
    There are bleach marks on my coraline algae and it seems as if particules can be seen in the water. Is this from using baking soda? Should I rather consider an alternative such as a Seachem product? I have Seachem buffer but do not have a ph test kit at the moment.

    It also seems as if my xenia is affected by it.

    What is your views of baking soda?
     
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  3. mariusmeyer

    mariusmeyer

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    Been using it for months with no issues and my xenia and coraline is going absolutely bos. I bake mine and just add it to unheated RO if I do a small amount. I am now running it through the dosing pump on a much higher concentration and I heated the RO up on the stove while adding it.
     
    Last edited: 16 Aug 2011
  4. Boegie

    Boegie Thread Starter

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    Thanks Marius. How do you actually bake it?
     
  5. Boegie

    Boegie Thread Starter

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    In the Coral magazine about trace elements, they say never to dose unless your nitrates and phosphates are 0. Could this be my problem as my nitrates is currenlty at 5. I started dosing vodka around 5 weeks ago and it should be 0 in the next couple of weeks.
     
  6. mariusmeyer

    mariusmeyer

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    I dont believe my nitrates and phosphates are 0 and I dont have issues. Baking it is simple. Place on baking tray and I bake it at 200degrees for 1h30min.
     
  7. Boegie

    Boegie Thread Starter

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    Thanks Marius. Will rather skip the baking method to save electricity, anyhow, this is why I never baked it. Quote from Reefcentral:
    "baked baking soda method causes "substantial" pH raise effect...versus the "unbaked" baking soda method."
     
  8. Boegie

    Boegie Thread Starter

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  9. mariusmeyer

    mariusmeyer

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    The following a a extract from randy's article found here. http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2004/4/chemistry

    Recipe 1 = Baked baking dosa
    Recipe 2 = unbaked.

    for reference 1meq/l alk = 2.8dKH

    Recipe #1 is for use in aquaria where the pH is normal to low. It will have a pH raising effect due to the elevated pH of the alkalinity part, as do most of the commercial two-part additives. The rise that you get will depend on the alkalinity in your aquarium, and, of course, on how much you add. If you add on the order of 0.5 meq/l of alkalinity then the pH will rise about 0.15 to 0.35 pH units immediately upon addition (and higher locally before it has a chance to mix into the whole aquarium).
    So if you are using limewater (kalkwasser) and the aquarium runs at pH 8.4 or above, this recipe is not the best choice. Otherwise, it is likely to be a good option.
    Recipe #2 is for use in aquaria where the pH is on the high side (above 8.3 or so). It will have a very small pH lowering effect when initially added. The drop that you get will depend on the alkalinity in your aquarium, and, of course, on how much you add. If you add on the order of 0.5 meq/l of alkalinity then the pH will drop by about 0.04 pH units immediately upon addition. The pH may later rise if the aquarium is permitted to blow off excess CO2. This recipe is half as concentrated as Recipe #1.
     
    Last edited: 16 Aug 2011
  10. Boegie

    Boegie Thread Starter

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    Thanks again Marius. Time to get a ph test kit. I just love this hobby, keeping me busy all the time. Another reason to test my ph:

    "an article by Julian Sprung last night and he said that a low PH is often the cause of melting Xenia. He stated that a PH of lower than 8.2 can often be attributed to Xenia die off."
     
    Last edited: 16 Aug 2011
  11. mariusmeyer

    mariusmeyer

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    Interesting. Maybe i'll go and check mine as well tonight. :) But whenever I tested it was around 8.0 - 8.3.
     
  12. Tremayn

    Tremayn

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    What I have found is that I had a problem mixing the pharma grade sodium bi carbonate in water. When I baked it for a bit then it worked!
     
  13. Duri

    Duri

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    I use this! works wonders... I heat up some water (not boiling) and add two table spoons and stir! add to water... thats all... make sure its dissolved otherwise it will hurt ur coral. I do it after water change or when my Kh drops.
     
  14. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    You don't HAVE to follow any recipe, although it is more convenient to use a pre-dissolved solution.

    I just add a teaspoon or two into a litre or two of RO water, mix well, let it stand for a while, and then add it to my overflow weir, allowing it to mix and dissipate throughout the sump before being pumped back up to the display tank (but then my tank is rather large, and this amount does not cause more than a 1.0 DkH increase in alkalinity. Using baked baking powder does raise the pH quite significantly in the short term, and one would be advised to add the solution over a period of time, and/or monitor the pH in real time, using an electronic pH meter.

    Hennie
     
  15. jacoc

    jacoc

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    Hennie wow much would you recomend to up the ph by (from 7.8-8.5 ) in a @ 24 deg/temp... tank/ 315l...my ca is also high @ 630 with a nutrafin kit...mag @ 1500+ with salifert kit...sg @0.22-3
     
    Last edited: 16 Aug 2011
  16. Tremayn

    Tremayn

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  17. jacoc

    jacoc

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    @Tremayn...the calculator is for when you need to up the chemicals nt down as i night have to do...exept for the ph..
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  18. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    Rapid changes are never good - I would suggest that the pH should not change by an average of more than 0.2 in 24 hours. I say average, because the pH swings from lights on to lights off could easily be as large as 0.4 in less than 12 hours, but increasing or decreasing the average reading (half-way between the extremes) should not be more than the daily deviation to either side... thus the recommendation of 0.2 max (if that makes sense...)

    I would re-check that Ca level - it is pretty much impossible to have a level that high without precipitation, especially given that your SG is on the low side. I suspect that the test kit is wrong, perhaps old.

    Hennie
     
    Last edited: 16 Aug 2011
  19. Tremayn

    Tremayn

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    Oh! lol .. Well water changes will do the trick. My Ca was crazy high but I just left it and it came down on its own
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
  20. jacoc

    jacoc

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    I wil have the tests done tomorow at exotics...the local lfs also tested and gave me a 620 reading on ca...will test every thing tomorow and let you know...also one of the monti's and a acropora is showing white at the tips/bleaching i think ...the other sps is doing well and the softies except for the pulcing zinia that is not pulcing and dont seem to extend fully ...I want to do a big wc..maybe its time...
     
  21. Reef Maniac

    Reef Maniac MASA Contributor

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    If they're much lighter right at the tips, it's probably a good sign, because that shows that they are growing fast - healthy SPS normally have lighter tips, so don't stress too much about this (IF it is only the tips...).

    Just make sure that the water parameters match as close as possible (especially SG, pH and Alk), and that the "new" water has been "matured" for at least two days (IMHO). Doing large water changes with freshly made new water that has a different SG, pH or alkalinity can actually cause more harm than good...

    Hennie
     
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