Bacterial and Plankton temperature tolerance

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by FransSny, 18 Mar 2011.

  1. FransSny

    FransSny

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    Ok, living at the colder part of the ocean I have always been wondering about what happens to the organisms inside the NSW we use for water changes.

    I think the general consensus is that they die off as soon as we introduce them into our tropical tanks...well that is what I thought as well, until I did some reading.

    Bacteria is actually quite easy, as I think we all know that they grow and multiply best at temps close to our own body temp (thus the reason for operating theaters being so cold!)

    Plankton , pods etc seem to be a bit more complicated, they also survive quite hectic temp fluctuations, but do suffer metabolic issues such as slowed growth, increased O2 demand, restricted movement etc.

    It seems like there are more important factors to consider than mere temp, ie pH , Salinity, nutrient composition etc. Even the species of bacteria , plankton etc will play a role.

    Anybody else looked into this or have comments on this.
     
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  3. Tony

    Tony

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    If you look at food bactaria, they will start to wake up at about 5-6 degrees and die off at about 64 degrees. The in between temperatures is where they become active and divide. A cant see why sea bacteria are any different as they are all simple organisms
     
  4. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Frans - i did alot of work isolating different bacterial sttrains form the sea a few years ago. The bacteria were collected on the West coast. Different species did grow at differing temps. Although all occur naturally on the west coast (so temp between 8 and 15 degrees) some actually grew best at 37, others at room temp and some were even happy to grow at 4! However, there were some that did not grow above room temp and were actually killed when the temp reached 30 degrees. So temp will effect the bacterial composition of your tank.
    Growing and surving are two differnt things. Temp did play a huge role in growth rate (and in some cases even growth form). Other factors played an equally large role. Something as simple as changing the carbon source (from sucrose to one of the algal carbohydrates) would dramatically change growth rates.
    Unfortunately you cant generalise with bacteria.
     
  5. FransSny

    FransSny Thread Starter

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    Thanx Dave (I new one of the smart oakes will read this :)). The reason for my question / observation is not to generalize but more to beg the question if adding our "cold" water to a tropical tank would cause massive die off of bacteria , plankton etc.

    I have read more than one post on MASA suggesting this. I personally dont agree (for the reasons you mentioned).

    The only effect I think there will be is a possibility of some die off (certain species) and slower (or increased) growth rates etc.

    And yes I also agree that above temp...loads of other factors influence bacterial load and composition. This is probably one of the reasons why bacterial additives prove to be effective as it balances the equation so to say.

    As I say its just a interesting thought ......;)
     
  6. Boegie

    Boegie

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    You know, what I would like, is a list of good bacteria, bad bacteria. A list of bacteria supplied by different manufatures such as Prodibio. And a list of bacteria obtained when doing a water change with NSW. And a list of bacteria that get skimmed and those that don't.

    I read about bad bacteria in this link: http://www.nova.edu/ncri/11icrs/abstract_files/icrs2008-000259.pdf

    Studies carried out on bleaching in corals in the last decade have linked bacteria (bacteria-mediated bleaching) as one of the causes of coral bleaching as a result of degradation/necrosis of zooxanthellae due to bacterial activity.​
     
  7. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    that would be a long list!
     
  8. FransSny

    FransSny Thread Starter

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    Boegie I have been trying to get that for AGES (look at my other thread re bacteria dosing) unfortunately when it comes to the manufactured ones I could only find the Microbelift range.

    As for good vs bad...I think you cant really do that as there are too many species and what is good for one situation probably isnt in another....
     
  9. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    I doubt manufacturers would tell you exactly what bacteria they use, ortherwise veryone would just go and buy those strains (there is liek a bacerial bank overseas) and the company would loose money.

    Very true. Alot of bacteria are opportunistic pathogens, meaning they perfectly harmless and are beneficial until something changes.
     
  10. HenkHugo

    HenkHugo

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    MicrobeLift has no issues giving the lists of bacteria in any of their products :D
     
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