Add-on's

Discussion in 'General Discussions and Advice' started by EFJ, 7 Dec 2011.

  1. EFJ

    EFJ MASA Contributor

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    Guys i would like to know what is the functions of all these extra add-on reactors and dosing pumps you get and for a beginner like my self what would the best be to start off with?
     
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  3. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    they just automate manual processes, if you wanting to learn the beans about reefing, i suggest doing things manually at first

    but most reactors are alternatives to passive filtering, they are active, eg carbon or phos reactors
    instead of having the media in a bag in your sump, you have them in a reactor and "force" water through them making them more efficient

    doing pumps one would use to dose daily additives, 2 part calcium and alk etc

    they are nice to haves, not needs :)
     
  4. DeanT

    DeanT Dean

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    i am also interested to know , which the larger tank keepers suggest .
    most of the larger tank seem to have reactors , and not dosing .
    is dosing for smaller tanks , and reactors for larger tank ?

    obviously with beginners , starting out with FOWLR , and then getting into the more advanced reefing , do you invest in reactors , or purchase dosing pumps , and maybe bundle this with a controller ?
     
  5. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    there is no rule, i have a carbon reactor on my little nano as i like to actively filter carbon

    its all about preference and budget
     
  6. DeanT

    DeanT Dean

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    is there any advantage , of one method over the other , or is it up to personal preference.
    i am also starting out , only buying live stock , next year , but i wanted to know as if one method is better over the long run , i would rather invest money properly knowing it will last and the method chosen will be the right one
     
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  7. 459b

    459b Moderator MASA Contributor

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    Tough question to answer. It comes down to what you want to keep, space, budget, time and what you want to get out of the hobby. People get into this hobby for different reasons and design a system based on their own needs. Some guys wil advocate one setup over another, but remeber that there are many ways to do things and succeed.
     
  8. Nemos Janitor

    Nemos Janitor

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    In years gone buy reactors were thought of as unnecessary and expensive. Reefers were advised to go the DSB route. ( No this is not another anti DSB post/ thread, so please don't turn it into one). These DSB,s worked very well and systems set up with them today still produce amassing displays. The most unfortunate downside to the DSB is the size it has to be to work efficiently with the increasing trend to stock tanks heavily. This started the trend of alternative ways to filter the water to maintain stable parameters for the various species the aquarist desired to keep.

    The first reactor I am going to refer to is the Denitrator. Nitrate filters go back many years and their are many versions. It started with a built in compartment built into the back of the tank through sulphur reactors to carbon feed reactors. The first carbon feed reactor that I can recall was the Aquamedic nitrate filter. They use a plastic ball called a deniball as the carbon source to eat the nitrate. There are a few other brands now available and the move to this type of filtration is becoming more popular.

    The latest craze is the NP reactors. I have played around with them and feel we still need to learn more before the system is perfected. It is progressed a long way since it was first introduced to the hobby. So this form of system is best left to the more experienced reefer. IMO.

    Then you have the Zeozit type systems. I have not played with them so I cannot comment on the system. Others on this forum should be able to help better.

    The above covers the basic filtration type reactors worth considering. Next comes the reactors that @dallasg referd to. The carbon and phosphate reactors. These are really chemical filtration methods to remove impurities from the water. Phosphate to remove phosphates and carbon to remove heavy metals and impuritys from the water. Carbon has many pros and cons and I would suggest you spend some time doing some reading before you use it.

    The next two most popular reactors are the calcium and kalkstirrer. Both of these are a means to add calcium to the water that is consumed by the corals. However with the development of the advanced "PRO" type salt mixes the Kalk stirrer is falling out of favour.

    Dosing pumps or peri pumps are used to do a number of things. They can dose your 2 or 3 part calcium mix. They can dose additives and liquid foods. They can dose the carbon source for your nitrate filter.

    Hope this answers some of the questions you may have.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Nov 2015
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  9. DeanT

    DeanT Dean

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    okay , we all know budget has a big part to play in many of the decisions in this hobby .
    does one method have the edge over the other.
    how does the cost of buying liquids ,compare to buying reactor media on a monthly basis ?

    i know with calcium , you need c0 bottles and these seem to be expensive, and also to have different reactor seems to take a serious amount of space.
    this is what confusses me , why have a large tank , and then add all the clutter of the reactors, but this seems to be the norm with alot of the supersize tank threads on the site.

    any large tank owners , care to add their point of views ?
     
  10. dallasg

    dallasg Moderator MASA Contributor

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    i have large and small tanks, and nieghter run the same as my preferences for them are different
    once again cost shouldnt be your deciding factor, we all do it, but one should decide whats best for the livestock we want to keep, if we cant afford whats needed then dont keep them, these are little lives we play with

    no method is better then another, i have DSB and no reactors, i have a zeovit tank with reactors and both serve their livestock well...

    if you are short of time and want a DT for show, then automation will help...
    if you like wetting your floors, playing with water, then a nice mix of both will do
     
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