03 Fish Id's Needed

Discussion in 'ID Needed' started by seank, 10 Feb 2008.

  1. seank

    seank

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    I caught a couple of fish this morning, but cannot confirm a 100% on the next 03 Fish.

    Please Id, as well as Latin name and also if it is Reef Safe

    Thank you:

    I think this is an Emporer Angelfish but not sure??

    [​IMG]


    I think this one is Sharpnose Puffer (Canthigaster Solandri) but again not 100% sure:

    [​IMG]


    On this one I could not even come close to an Id, it is smaller than my Pinky:

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. seank

    seank Thread Starter

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    Ok, I found this on the Puffer. Now I only need the next 02 please:

    Captive Care

    Both the Papuan and ocellated tobies are excellent aquarium inhabitants. The only possible drawback with these tobies is that some individuals will nip the fins of other fishes. You may not see them doing the nipping, only the results of it – circular bite marks on the fins. Fortunately, most individuals do not engage in this undesirable behavior. When they do nip tankmates, they most often assault long-finned fishes, like comets, bannerfishes, batfishes and tangs. Tobies are rarely aggressive towards other fish species, with the possible exception of congeners. The Papuan and ocellated tobies are territorial fishes, with males excluding consexuals from their territories. Therefore, individuals (especially males) may fight with each other if placed in the same tank. It is possible to keep a male with a female together in a larger aquarium (e.g., 100 gallons or more).​
    [​IMG]

    The Papua toby (Canthigaster papua) is one of the most attractive members of the genus.

    Toby fighting usually begins with bouts of displaying, where the combatants increase their apparent size by erecting a ridge on the back and belly. They perform these lateral displays to try and drive their opponent away with out actually coming to blows. But, if one individual does not back down and leave the area biting will usually ensue. This can result in severe injuries. The problem with captive combat, is that the fish that retreats cannot “leave the area” since our aquariums are so much smaller than the normal toby territory and hence this subordinate is chastised by the more dominant, or territory holding fish. If it gets to the point where biting occurs you will need to separate the fish or risk losing one of them to injury. You could try taking the dominant fish out of the tank and placing it in a different aquarium for a week or two, and then try adding the more aggressive fish back into the tank and see what happens. In some cases the subordinate will accept its position in the pecking order from the onset and avoid the more dominant fish. In these cases lethal fighting usually does not occur. ​
    [​IMG]
    Canthigaster papua has long been considered a color form of C. solandri. Note the differences between this photo and the shots of C. solandri below.

    Tobies will eat a wide variety of chopped, fresh seafood, flake foods and frozen preparations. It is very important to feed these fish at least twice a day, especially in tanks that lack plant growth or sessile invertebrates. If fed any less than this, these fishes will loss weight. Tobies do best when housed in a tank that has an abundance of fleshy or filamentous algae, on which they can browse throughout the day. Because they are omnivores, it is important to include sufficient quantities of plant material in their diets, including algae, spinach, dried algae and frozen and/or flake foods formulated for herbivores. Tobies should also be housed in a tank with some hard calcareous decor that they can nip at or the aquarist can add a small piece of live rock now and then for them to chew on. This will help ware down their teeth, which will continue to grow and can get so long that they interfere with their normal feeding behavior.​
     
  4. seank

    seank Thread Starter

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    Jeezzz, I must say, this sites response is sharp today....LoL
     
  5. nakoma

    nakoma

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    the first fish the dark blue one is a semicircle angel fish very comon this time of the year and the puffer you are correct about that and the redish little fish is a very comon little pest of a damsel fish you comonly found in tidal pools in of the east coast it is called a one spot damsel fish (chrysiptera unimaculata) feeds mainly on alge
     
  6. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    your angel is a semi not an emperor.last pic is a one spot damsel.sorry cant get the latin names now
     
  7. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    ok here we go Semi cricle angel fish Pomocanthus semicirculatur
     
  8. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    onespot damsel Chrysiptera unimaculata
     
  9. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Hello Sean - the top one seems like it is a semi-circle angel - definitely not a emperor angel.

    The third one I think is a "rainbow chromis" - I might be incorrect.

    Not soo sure about exactly what puffer the second one is...
     
  10. viper357

    viper357 Admin MASA Contributor

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    Put the puffer back Sean, I had two in my tank and all they ate was my 2 cleaner shrimps and the spines on my urchin, they didn't take any other foods and eventually died from starvation.
     
  11. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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  12. jacquesb

    jacquesb Retired Moderator

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    Thanks, Mekaeel - I saw a LOT of those little damsels when we went to the Seychelles. BUT we only saw them in the shallows - while snorkeling - not while SCUBA diving....
     
  13. Alfie

    Alfie

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    Third one looks like Cross' Damsel (Neoglyphidodon crossi)
     
  14. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    trust me.its a onespot damsel,been there done that with these guys quiet often :p
     
  15. Alfie

    Alfie

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  16. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    all cool buddy :)
     
  17. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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  18. seank

    seank Thread Starter

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    uhmmmmm, you got any ideas as to how to get him out of the system- no diving allowed though in the tank....:whistling:

    I added him Dean cause of what I have read. I don't have cleaner shrimps and hopefully he will eat some of the Urchins as I take out an Urchin every week, They either come in (eggs/babies) with water changes or they breed in the tank. Getting a bit gatvol of Urchins as I always have to carefully check under the rocks if I want to move something
     
  19. Alfie

    Alfie

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    Mekaeel, just as a matter of interest I could not find a pic of a juvenile Cross' Damsel so I took one out of Dr Burgess's Atlas. Note the black spot it has as well. That is maybe why I thought it was Cross'.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. Mekaeel

    Mekaeel Moderator MASA Contributor

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    mmh.very similar,wonder if its the same thing
     
  21. Alfie

    Alfie

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    It was only the red colour that made me think that. I do not know what a juvenile One Spot looks like though.
     
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