RSS Interview with Waveline Part 2: departmentalization for quality control

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  1. MASA Admin

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    And, now on to part two of the series.
    The importance of departmentalization of the DC pump for quality control.

    Tony: So Daniel, looking around the Waveline facility I can’t help, but notice many little departments. Can you please explain why so many little divisions/departments just to manufacture a pump?

    Daniel: Well the manufacturing of the pump is simple believe it or not. What’s complicated is in the quality and control. We put in place different stations to standardize our manufacturing process. Each module is responsible for a specific task of the pump. Later we will tour the factory and you will see we have different modules throughout the company. It’s not one workshop that does everything. Each module is responsible and we can isolate each task. And this is following the ISO standard. What we are trying to do is to implement a standardize manufacturing process. We want to gear/structure our company to grow and manufacture large capacity of pumps. So, we’ll tour later and I’ll explain to you which module and what is the function of each module.

    Tony: Can you give us an example of some of these modules?

    Daniel: We’ll tour first with what is the design and engineering module, you’ll see all of the circuit designs and software development, done in one department and that’s the electrical engineering. Than we will go after to the mechanical engineering, it’s all the mold design, the impeller design, all of the mechanical sides of the pump. And then we will go through the manufacturing, the winding machine, epoxy filling, testing module, the longevity testing module and what’s the most important to all of that one is the documentation. Everything that we do along the line, we document every step of the way. So that we have a reference that we can go back and validate what we are doing.

    Next part of this series we will look deep into the internal depths of a DC pump.

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